APH Annual Report cover image, fiscal year 2009.

American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.
2009 Annual Report
1839 Frankfort Avenue
Louisville, Kentucky 40206
USA
www.aph.org

2009 Annual Report
October 1, 2008 — September 30, 2009
American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.

Also available in PDF Edition


INTRODUCTION

Photo of front of APH building

SERVICE SINCE 1858

The American Printing House for the Blind (APH) has served our nation's blind and visually impaired citizens since before the Civil War. Founded in 1858, APH is the oldest company in the U.S. dedicated to creating products for blind people and is the largest organization of its kind in the world.

EXTENSIVE RANGE OF PRODUCTS

APH's product lines uphold our mission and include a wide variety of unique educational and daily living items. Some examples of our hundreds of products include: accessible textbooks and tests; large print organizers; braille teaching programs; talking educational software; tactile graphics tools; and science teaching kits.

In partnership with the field of blindness, the APH Department of Research supports the creation of a wide range of products by maintaining ongoing product-specific research and development activities.

APH's offerings are detailed in our comprehensive Instructional Products Catalog, organized into the National Agenda's core and expanded core curriculum instructional areas.

Specialty products such as audio books and braille restaurant menus are created by APH for commercial customers. In addition, APH makes custom-ordered materials on demand, such as single copies of large print textbooks.

UNIQUE SERVICES OFFERED

Examples of services offered by APH include:

MANDATE AND CORPORATE STATUS

Much of APH's mandate is derived from the federal Act to Promote the Education of the Blind of 1879. This act designates APH as the official supplier of educational materials to all eligible blind students in the United States working at less than college level.

APH is a private, nonprofit 501(c)(3) corporation. Responsibility for its administration rests with:

APH voluntarily complies with the provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 that sets the business standards for corporate governance and financial disclosure.

For additional information on APH and its full range of products and services that support products, visit www.aph.org or our shopping site: http://shop.aph.org.

MISSION STATEMENT

The American Printing House for the Blind promotes independence of blind and visually impaired persons by providing specialized materials, products, and services needed for education and life.

OFFICERS, TRUSTEES, AND COMMITTEES

portrait
W. James Lintner, Jr.
Board Chairman

CORPORATE TRUSTEES

CORPORATE OFFICERS

EX OFFICIO TRUSTEES

Ex Officio Trustees are responsible for the administration of the federal Act to Promote the Education of the Blind of 1879. The Ex Officio Trustees are the executive heads of schools for the blind, the chief state school officers of each state department of education, or the executive officers of other agencies serving the blind. If they choose, these executives may designate the Trusteeship to an appropriate professional within their organizations.

EX OFFICIO TRUSTEE ADVISORY COMMITTEES OCTOBER, 2008—OCTOBER, 2009

The name of each member is followed by his or her term expiration date.

EDUCATIONAL SERVICES ADVISORY COMMITTEE

EDUCATIONAL PRODUCTS ADVISORY COMMITTEE

FINANCIAL AND PRODUCTION HIGHLIGHTS

REVENUE DOLLAR

TYPES OF PRODUCTS SOLD

APH PRODUCTION HIGHLIGHTS

Braille Pages Produced

Pages Printed in Large Type Department

Audio Minutes Recorded

*Note: APH now outsources the majority of its printing. The number of pages produced outside of APH are not reflected in this figure.

EXECUTIVE REPORT

portrait
Tuck Tinsley III
APH President

2009 EXECUTIVE REPORT

Fiscal year 2009 was a year of growth and progress for the American Printing House for the Blind. With the dedicated commitment of APH employees and strong guidance of APH's Board of Trustees, major activities during the year fell into five categories: 1) maintaining focus on APH's mission; 2) strengthening infrastructure; 3) continuing to improve; 4) advancing the mission through prudent use of endowment funds; and 5) celebrating successes.

FOCUS ON MISSION

In line with APH's mission, "To promote the independence of blind and visually impaired persons by providing specialized materials, products, and services needed for education and life," seventy new products were brought to market in 2009. The new products included Building on Patterns, First Grade, Unit 1; MathBuilders 8; Refreshabraille 18; Wilson Reading System, Large Print; and many others that were met with great demand and positive responses.

Much effort was focused on the new Perkins-APH Brailler, introduced in 2008. Due to several problems with the machine, we stopped taking orders on January 2, 2009; corrected the problems; and again began taking orders on October 6, 2009. APH continues to work with Perkins to make this new writer as reliable as the "Classic" Perkins. The Perkins-APH Brailler is quieter, lighter, and more comfortable to use than the Classic. It includes functions that the field requested: a way to easily read the page while writing, a shorter keystroke requiring less force, margin guides on the front, and a handle that allows carrying without extending the arm away from the leg.

Staff members in Field Services were busy in 2009. Highlights of their activities include:

APH databases continued to provide valuable services. At the end of FY 2009:

During the year, APH utilized over 300 certified braille transcribers throughout North America, including inmates in eight prison programs, to complete 122 new textbook transcriptions. In addition, staff produced 900 unique tests and test-related materials in accessible media and the Woodcock-Johnson III: Tests of Achievement—Braille Adaptation.

STRENGTHENING APH'S INFRASTRUCTURE

A major 2009 highlight was the acquisition of the American Foundation for the Blind's Migel Library. This 40,000-volume collection, described as the largest non-medical research library on blindness in the world, was named to honor AFB's first Board Chairman, M.C. Migel. For many years, researchers accessed the collection at AFB's Manhattan headquarters. With the Migel Library now in Louisville, researchers and others can access this valuable collection along with four other significant collections at APH: The Barr Library of professional research materials; the APH Museum Collection documenting the history of education for the blind; the AER Warren Bledsoe Orientation and Mobility Archives; and the Braille Authority of North America Archives.

During 2009, we changed the format of "Fred's Head from APH," an online service that provides tips, articles, and resources for blind and visually impaired people, from a database to a blog. With over 3,400 articles posted to the blog, Fred's Head is at the center of APH's initial move into social media, which now includes APH's presence on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter.

Communications staff also continued to add downloadable manuals, webcasts, and video presentations about APH products to APH's website.

ALWAYS LOOKING TO IMPROVE

APH's significant investment of money, time, and resources came to fruition when a new system for the APH online shopping site (shop.aph.org), Louis, AMP, and the APH File Repository debuted on April 6, 2009. The new shopping site, which replaces APH's previous web ordering system, brings both new technology and improved shopping opportunities to our customers. In addition, Louis offers many new features and now uses a Google-powered search system. Behind the scenes, we have much closer integration between APH systems and databases, and a solid platform on which to grow and improve.

With the new system, we are better able to gather data on visits to APH's websites and use that information to improve them. For example, from the time we rolled out the new system on April 6 until the end of the fiscal year, we had 34,550 visits to Louis, with the average visitor spending 7.55 minutes and viewing 8.6 web pages. The site had visitors from every state and 84 countries and territories.

Other examples of improvement are:

USE OF ENDOWMENT TO ADVANCE APH'S MISSION

We continued the Executive-in-Residence program that was initiated in 2007. APH was honored to have Phil Hatlen as the Executive-in-Residence this year. Phil's major focus was the Expanded Core Curriculum (ECC), with a survey to determine a) current status-how many blind and visually impaired students are receiving instruction in the ECC; b) how instruction can be improved; and c) what products APH can produce to enhance the teaching of the ECC.

APH coordinates and administers the National Prison Braille Network through endowment funding, hosting and conducting a Prison Braille Forum each year during Annual Meeting. Two publications released this year are 1) Guidelines for Starting and Operating Prison Braille Programs, and 2) The 2009 Prison Braille Program Directory which contains program data and contact information for 31 prison braille programs across the country. Both publications are available free-of-charge.

We also completed seven interviews for APH's Corporate Memory Project this year, including former Board Member George Gill, and current Trustee Dr. Virginia Keeney. Sixty-six oral history interviews of former and current staff and board members have been conducted to date.

CELEBRATING SUCCESSES

During October, November, and December, 2008, the last three months of APH's 150th anniversary and the first three months of FY 2009, we concluded the celebration of APH's 150th anniversary with three activities: the debut of History in the Making: The Story of the American Printing House for the Blind, 1858-2008, at last year's Annual Meeting; completion of the front lawn renovation with the installation of a wrought iron fence on State Street and an original fountain sculpture by a local artist; and a reception honoring Governor Steve Beshear in the APH Museum in December.

In March of 2009, our year-long 150th celebration won the top award of the Kentucky Historical Society, with APH being named Kentucky's Outstanding History Organization for 2008. In addition, the book History in the Making won the 2009 top award, Best in Show, of Southeastern Museums Conference serving the 12 Southeastern states, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands.

And, to top things off, sales for 2009 were $24 million, a 4.5% increase over 2008 and the highest total ever for APH.

DATA FROM THE FY 2009 FEDERAL QUOTA CENSUS

Data for FY 2009 regarding the Act to Promote the Education of the Blind indicate the number of legally blind students registered was 59,355, an increase of 1.7% (967) over the number registered for FY 2008. The 2009 appropriation provided $304.93 per student for educational materials, a 2.4% increase over the $297.88 per capita allocation in 2008. Of the 59,355 students, 9.4% (5,560) were registered as braille readers, 26.8% (15,914) as visual readers, 7.8% (4,630) as auditory readers, 34% (20,246) as non-readers, and 22% (13,005) as pre-readers. Of this group, 83.3% (49,442) were registered by state departments of education, 8.8% (5,238) were registered by residential schools for the blind, 5.1% (3,027) were registered by rehabilitation programs, and 2.8% (1,648) were registered by programs for the multiply disabled.

As we begin 2010, APH's 152nd year of service, we remain committed to the provision of textbooks, educational aids, and other materials necessary for the education of our nation's blind students, APH's primary role. Our success in fulfilling this important role depends greatly on the ongoing involvement of consumers and service providers.

On behalf of the Board of Trustees and administration, we close by expressing sincere appreciation to our Ex Officio Trustees for the valuable role they play in administering the Act. Special thanks must also be directed to the dedicated employees of APH, without whom APH would not exist.

Respectfully submitted,
W. James Lintner, Jr., Chairman
Tuck Tinsley III, President

SECRETARY'S REPORT

SECRETARY'S REPORT, 2009 FORMAL MEETING OF EX OFFICIO TRUSTEES

The 141st Formal Meeting of the Ex Officio Trustees of the American Printing House for the Blind (APH) convened at 12:40 p.m., October 17, 2009, at the Seelbach Hilton Hotel in Louisville, Kentucky. The following conferees were present:

EX OFFICIO TRUSTEE ATTENDEES

APH STAFF ATTENDEES

MINUTES OF THE BUSINESS MEETING

The meeting was opened with a welcome from Dr. Tuck Tinsley III, President and member of APH's Board of Trustees. Ex Officio Trustees and APH staff in attendance introduced themselves and the organizations and departments they represented.

COMMENTS REGARDING FY2009

Dr. Tinsley provided a state-of-the-company report and highlights of FY2009, which included:

APPROVAL OF ADVISORY COMMITTEE REPORTS

James Downs, Chair of the Educational Products Advisory Committee (EPAC) and Ex Officio Trustee representing the Georgia State Department of Education, and Michael Bina, Chair of the Educational Services Advisory Committee (ESAC) and Ex Officio Trustee representing the Maryland School for the Blind, introduced each of their committee members and requested approval of the reports previously distributed to the Ex Officio Trustees. A motion to accept the reports as offered was made, seconded, and passed unanimously.

APPROVAL OF COMMITTEE NOMINEES

Dean Stenehjem, Chair of the Nominations Committee and Ex Officio Trustee representing the Washington State School for the Blind, presented the committee's slate of nominees for advisory committee members and chairpersons as follows:

Nancy Niebregge, Ex Officio Trustee representing Braille Institute of America, was nominated as the Chair of EPAC for 2009.
Todd Reeves, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Western Pennsylvania School for Blind Children, will be completing the term of James Oldham, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Tennessee School for the Blind.
Linda Lyle, Ex Officio Trustee representing the New Mexico School for the Visually Handicapped, and Yvonne Ali, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, Missouri, were nominated to serve three-year terms for EPAC.
Steven Rothstein, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Perkins School for the Blind, was nominated as the alternative committee member for EPAC for 2009.
Frank Simpson, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Lavelle School for the Blind, was nominated as the Chair of ESAC for 2009.
Sally Giittinger, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Nebraska Center for the Education of Children who are Blind or Visually Impaired, and Jonn Paris-Salb, Ex Officio Trustee representing the California Department of Education, were nominated to serve two-year terms for ESAC.
Anglyn Young, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Arkansas State Department of Education, was nominated as the alternate committee member for ESAC.

A motion to accept the nominees as EPAC and ESAC committee members was made, seconded, and unanimously passed.

RECOGNITION OF RETIRING ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Bob Brasher and Janie Blome recognized the retiring Chairs of the Advisory Committees, Michael Bina and James Downs. Also recognized were the alternate members of both Advisory Committees, Barb Perkis and Dean Stenehjem.

Dr. Tinsley provided the closing remarks. The meeting was adjourned at 2:15 p.m.

Respectfully submitted,
Bill Beavin
Secretary

Note: Full reports of the Ex Officio Trustee Advisory Committees are provided in this annual report.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE 2009 APH ANNUAL MEETING

Photo of three peoplePhil Hatlen, Superintendent of the Texas School for the Blind (retired) was the recipient of APH's highest honor, the Wings of Freedom Award. Hatlen was honored for his lifetime achievement in the field of blindness, including the creation of the expanded core curriculum. Here Hatlen poses with Patricia Williams of the Hatlen Center (left) and Betsy Wada.



Photo of two menSamir Azer of the Kentucky School for the Blind was the recipient of APH's Virgil Zickel Award. Azer received the award for creating novel materials to help teach the periodic table of the elements and for working with APH staff to create a product based on these materials. Here Azer (left) poses with APH President Tuck Tinsley.



Photo of two menCarl Augusto, President of the American Foundation of the Blind, gave an inspirational speech about his life journey and his keys to success. Here Augusto (left) poses with Tuck Tinsley.



Photo of a large groupA special orientation breakfast is held for new Ex Officio Trustees appointed during the fiscal year, with seasoned Trustees providing advice. Left to right, standing: Dorinda Rife (MA), Meg Stone (KY), Dan Wenzel (WI), Denise Warren (UT), Karen Ross (MA); left to right seated: Alice Woog (MN), Linda Rosendall (MD), Andrea Noel (DC).



Photo of large groupEach year APH helps a group of direct service providers who have never attended Annual Meeting with an attendance scholarship. The 2009 scholars and their sponsoring Ex Officio Trustees were (l-r) Karen Ross (MA), sponsor of Justine Muir; Julie VanDover (SD), sponsored by Marjorie Kaiser; Clay Jeffcoat, who was sponsored by Marty McKenzie (SC); Michele Craig, sponsored by Dottie Goodman (TX) (not pictured).



Photo of a boyStudent Chase Crispin (NE) demonstrates APH's Braille+ Mobile Manager in the Products Showcase.



Photo of two womenFormer Trustee and legendary 2000 Wings of Freedom recipient Alice Post (IL) visits with Barb Perkis (IL).



Photo of a woman and young boyWinning APH InSights competition artist Alvin Toledo (PA) and his mother, pose with Alvin's artwork.



Photo of a manAdult APH InSights artist Chapelle Letman (OH) poses behind his sculpture.



Photo of two peopleHall of Fame Chair Jim Deremeik (MD) with Hall Induction Ceremony Facilitator Jane Erin (AZ).



Photo of three men2009 Hall of Fame Inductees Euclid Herie (left) and Dean Tuttle, with plaque artist Andrew Dakin (middle). Andrew has sculpted all 44 bas relief plaques in the Hall.



Photo of a manDerrick Smith (AL) explains MathBuilder graphing.



Photo of a large groupStanding room only in the Lighting Guide Kit session.



Photo of three peopleClosing session presenters Janie Blome, Bob Brasher, and Nancy Niebrugge (CA).



REPORTS FROM THE ADVISORY COMMITTEES

Reports of the Advisory Committees to the Ex Officio Trustees of the American Printing House for the Blind for Fiscal Year 2009

FORMAL REPORT: 2009 NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE FOR EX OFFICIO TRUSTEE ADVISORY COMMITTEES

The members of the 2009 Nominations Committee are:

Members of the Committee are honored to have been asked to perform the important assignment of nominating Ex Officio Trustees to serve on APH's two Advisory Committees.

The Educational Products Advisory Committee and the Educational Services Advisory Committee support APH in the organization's continuous improvement process, focusing on providing quality products and services that effectively meet the needs of our field. Ex Officio Trustees benefit and contribute through service on the Advisory Committees; the experience is an opportunity to learn about APH and to impact our important work.

Advisory Committee members are nominated with the following in mind:

The 2009 Nominations Committee recommended the following slate that was unanimously approved at the Formal Meeting of the Ex Officio Trustees convened on October 17, 2009 in Louisville, Kentucky:

EDUCATIONAL PRODUCTS ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Chair for a one-year term: Nancy Niebrugge, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Braille Institute of America (CA)

For three-year terms as committee members: Yvonne Ali, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education; Linda Lyle, Ex Officio Trustee representing the New Mexico School for the Visually Handicapped and the New Mexico State Department of Education

Alternate for a one-year term: Steven Rothstein, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Perkins School for the Blind (MA)

The full 2009-2010 Educational Products Advisory Committee will be: (The year preceding the name indicates the final year of regular committee tenure.)

THE EDUCATIONAL SERVICES ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Chair for a one-year term: Frank Simpson, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Lavelle School for the Blind (NY)

For two-year terms as committee members: Sally Giittinger, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Nebraska Center for the Education of Children Who are Blind and Visually Impaired; Jonn Paris-Salb, Ex Officio Trustee representing the California Department of Education

Alternate for a one-year term: Angyln Young, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Arkansas State Department of Education

The full 2009-2010 Educational Services Advisory Committee will be: (The year preceding the name indicates the final year of regular committee tenure.)

The Nominations Committee thanks the new and returning Advisory Committee members and chairs for their willingness to serve. We encourage all interested Ex Officio Trustees to declare your interest to be a future Advisory Committee member; it is the single most important way to contribute as an Ex Officio Trustee.

Respectfully submitted,
Dean Stenehjem, Chair

Jackie Denk and Barbara Perkis, Members of the Nominations Committee
Louisville, Kentucky
October 17, 2009

REPORT OF THE EDUCATIONAL SERVICES ADVISORY COMMITTEE TO THE TRUSTEES OF THE AMERICAN PRINTING HOUSE FOR THE BLIND FOR FISCAL YEAR 2009

PURPOSE OF ESAC

The purpose of the Educational Services Advisory Committee (ESAC) is to:

INTRODUCTION TO ESAC REPORT

In April of 2009 the Educational Services Advisory Committee (ESAC) and the Educational Products Advisory Committee (EPAC) met in joint and separate sessions. The ESAC committee met to address the 2008 ESAC report and to develop commendations and recommendations. To assist with this endeavor, interactive presentations were made by APH's administrative staff and ESAC committee members. These interactive presentations provided progress updates on the 2008 recommendations, operations and information on new initiatives.

ESAC COMMENDATIONS 2009

Consistent with the Act to Promote the Education of the Blind (1879), the Committee commends APH for:

  1. Creating a positive working environment for staff and a transparent, customer-responsive climate that invites open communication and collaboration between Ex Officio Trustees and the APH leadership team.
  2. Supporting the staff's innovative approach to solving unique challenges and furthering opportunities for customers by their hardworking, caring, and thoughtful contributions.
  3. Addressing the following recommendations in the 2008 ESAC report:
    1. Expand products and services to students who are categorized as non-readers.
    2. Enhance the Student Registration System (SRS) with improved security, robustness, cross-referencing, and design features which allow for future improvements.
    3. Develop the virtual tour of the APH Museum.
    4. Produce product infomercials.
    5. Develop alternative assessment guidelines.
  4. Enhancing the APH website by implementing:
    1. Social networking strategies to ensure increased exposure to stakeholders who may benefit from APH products and services.
    2. Improved navigability, e-commerce features, customer interaction, and Google Search Engine capabilities.
  5. Expanding Field Service presentations to allied professional organizations and families to introduce them to APH products and services.
  6. Exceeding the U.S. Department of Education's NIMAC grant timelines for usage and capacity.
  7. Implementing the Tactical Graphics Image Library and developing a plan to increase acquisitions.
  8. Initiating meaningful and effective strategies for new, as well as experienced, Ex Officio Trustees that include welcoming, mentoring, orientation, and training.

ESAC RECOMMENDATIONS 2009

The Educational Services Advisory Committee (ESAC) recommends that APH:

  1. Implement their plan to assist Ex Officio Trustees to promote the Act by providing information that can be used in presentations to members of their respective congressional delegations.
  2. Consider acquiring the AFB Migel Library to improve the field's accessibility to this unique and invaluable resource for research.
  3. Continue posting "home grown" videos on the web that demonstrate APH products.
  4. Evaluate the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of distance-based training and determine the necessary resources and development of APH staff expertise in use of delivering information via this methodology.
  5. Consider partnering with other organizations to sponsor regional or national conferences for direct service providers on the range, scope, use and value of APH products and services.
  6. Investigate paid web advertising and raise APH Google rank to increase awareness and access for families and service providers who could benefit from APH products and services.
  7. Expand the Louis database by incorporating table of contents, cover images and copyright and publishing information when missing from record.
  8. Improve the APH website by creating consistent visual presentation, branding, graphic format, and navigation tools.
  9. Implement plan to provide training to assistants working with Ex Officio Trustees to register students in the APH quota registration.
  10. Collect census information on the primary language of learners in order to project for future products and services.
  11. Expand the Louis system to allow for unified search capability.
  12. Expand the Tactile Graphics Image Library usage by:
    1. Acquiring more graphic images for all ages of reader and non-reading populations.
    2. Developing awareness and increasing training opportunities.

Respectfully submitted,

Michael Bina, Chair
Educational Services Advisory Committee

REPORT OF THE EDUCATIONAL PRODUCTS ADVISORY COMMITTEE TO THE TRUSTEES OF THE AMERICAN PRINTING HOUSE FOR THE BLIND FOR FISCAL YEAR 2009

PURPOSE OF EPAC

The purpose of the Educational Products Advisory Committee (EPAC) is:

INTRODUCTION TO EPAC REPORT

In May of 2009, the Educational Products Advisory Committee (EPAC) met for the eighth year as a formal advisory body to the American Printing House for the Blind (APH). The committee members gathered to hear responses to the recommendations from the previous year. They heard general information from each of the Department Directors about the past year and activities that have taken place in each department. Additionally, members of the committee met individually with project staff. The EPAC would like to express gratitude for being welcomed with open arms and generous hospitality. The candidness of the APH staff and administration during our discussions was much appreciated.

EPAC COMMENDATIONS 2009

The EPAC commends the American Printing House for the Blind for:

  1. Solicitation of partnerships involving both national and international experts and companies within and outside our field. We believe this approach lends credibility and professional relevance to APH products. Most notable of these include the variety of technology firms, contracted expert authors, and key individuals who work in our field.
  2. Responding to a great need in the field by expediting the Building on Patterns project, and making significant improvements in the quality of this product. This action included re-organizing the workflow by dedicating additional manpower and resources as well as enlisting the participation of many skilled and highly respected professionals. Building on Patterns is a fine example of what APH can do to promote the education of students who are blind and visually impaired.
  3. Developing the Intelligence Testing of Individuals who are Blind or Visually Impaired position paper, and pursuing partnerships with applicable professional organizations.
  4. Their growing commitment to improvement in their technology infrastructure and e-commerce system. The enhancements completed this year to the Louis Database will facilitate the ability to search and find accessible products through a greatly improved user interface. In addition, these measures give our industry and products greater presence in the online community through search engine optimization.
  5. Undertaking the innovative cortical visual impairment project and for their willingness to spend the time and effort to create a foundational document based on national and international perspectives. The accompanying DVD project will provide valuable information to the field.
  6. Proactively seeking partnerships with test publishers such as Curriculum Associates and The Woodcock-Munoz Foundation, who graciously provided their expertise and financial support for adapting accessible test materials.
  7. Exceeding the expectations and statutory requirements associated with the National Instructional Materials Access Center in both quality and quantity of files sets available in the repository. The staff has been diligent in their responses to the complex set of issues brought forth by both individuals and organizations.
  8. Their thorough process, variety of internal and external resources, and extensive field review used in the development of Address: Earth, Sections I and II. The committee considers this process as exemplary and the resulting atlas as a classic reference book.
  9. Fostering and maintaining a work environment that builds positive staff morale. APH employees clearly enjoy the work that they do, and feel valued by each other, administration, and the field.

EPAC RECOMMENDATIONS 2009

The EPAC recommends that the American Printing House for the Blind:

  1. Pursue the development of a replacement for the Book Port that will be affordable, can play a variety of digital and audio formats, and uses an interface that is simple and intuitive.
  2. Insure Building on Patterns, Grade 1, Units 1-4 is ready for purchase by the beginning of the 2009 school year and the remaining units 5-7 by the end of the calendar year. In order to provide continuity for the students who are using Building on Patterns, the initial units of grade 2 should be completed by the beginning of the 2010 school year and the remaining units by the end of 2010. After Building on Patterns, Grade 2, is completed, the project team should re-visit Building on Patterns, kindergarten level, to bring it up to the new standards that are used in grades 1 and 2.
  3. Reduce development and production backlogs and implement solutions to reduce wait-times in areas such as specification writing, model creation, embossing, and printing. Consideration should be given, when feasible, to outsourcing or adding staff to ensure the most efficient and timely completion of products so that students may have access to them as soon as possible.
  4. Continue to research and develop visual display methods that can be used in tandem with products that are currently speech-only so that teachers, parents, and other professionals can view student work. Furthermore, it is recommended that the capability for printing be added to appropriate products.
  5. Place Verbal View Vista® on hold until it can be developed for the Microsoft® Windows 7 operating system, and make the development of the Microsoft® Office 2007 ribbon a priority.
  6. Create a summary document providing guidance to parents, teachers, and beginning transcribers regarding tactile graphics as a resource to the APH Tactile Graphics Library. The document should follow proposed Braille Authority of North America Tactile Graphics Guidelines.
  7. In order to ensure earlier involvement in product development, APH should work with the EPAC to include the committee's input prior to review by the APH Product Evaluation Team.

Respectfully submitted,

James Downs, Chair
Educational Products Advisory Committee

ADDENDUM TO THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE REPORTS, PROVIDED BY APH: APH PRODUCTS APPROVED FOR PURCHASE WITH FEDERAL QUOTA FUNDS, FY2009

Digital Light Box Artwork: Supporting Language and Literacy

Early Braille Trade Books: Sunshine Kits

Geometro Kits

Minibook

Refreshable Braille Display

Sense of Science: Astronomy (all items in series)

Sound Adapted Tangle® Ball Kit

Step by Step

Test Ready (all items in series)

Turbo 6 Talking Battery Charger

DISTRIBUTION OF ELIGIBLE STUDENTS

Based on the Federal Quota Census of January 7, 2008 (FY2009)

Tables showing the distribution (link opens a new window)

AGENCIES RECEIVING FEDERAL QUOTA FUNDS

Agencies for the Education of the Visually Impaired in the United States Receiving Federal Quota Funds Due Under an Act to Promote the Education of the Blind, Fiscal Year 2009

Note: The agencies in this section are in the following order within each state: State Departments of Education, Schools for the Blind, Rehabilitation Programs, Programs for Students with Multiple Disabilities.

*Note: The abbreviation "PNP" means "Private, Non-profit."

State and AgencyPupils as of January 7, 2008FY 2009 Allocation in Dollars
Alabama
Alabama State Department of Education, Talladega863266,905.92
Alabama State Department of Education, *PNP, Talladega7222,267.93
Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind, Talladega31196,185.10
Alaska
Alaska State Department of Education, Anchorage17754,742.00
American Samoa
American Samoa Department of Education, Pago Pago154,639.15
Arizona
Arizona State Department of Education, Phoenix617190,823.82
Arizona State Schools for the Deaf and the Blind, Tucson26381,339.81
Arizona State Department of Education, PNP, Phoenix20563,401.75
Arkansas
Arkansas State Department of Education, Sherwood28387,525.35
Arkansas State Department of Education, PNP, Sherwood6821,030.83
Arkansas School for the Blind, Little Rock10030,927.68
Lions World Services for the Blind, Little Rock4915,154.57
Conway Human Development Center, Conway7723,814.32
California
California Department of Education, Sacramento5,1091,580,095.40
California Department of Education, PNP, Sacramento871269,380.13
California School for the Blind, Fremont7723,814.32
Braille Institute of America, Los Angeles5517,010.23
Orientation Center for the Blind, Albany185,566.98
Colorado
Colorado Department of Education, Colorado Springs705218,040.18
Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind, Colorado Springs6419,793.72
Rehabilitation Center, Denver134,020.60
Connecticut
Board of Education & Services for the Blind, Windsor657203,194.89
Board of Education & Services for the Blind, PNP, Windsor51,546.38
Oak Hill School, Hartford175,257.71
Connecticut State Department of Mental Retardation, Hartford8726,907.09
Delaware
State Department of Education, New Castle319,587.58
Division for the Visually Impaired, New Castle15447,628.63
District of Columbia
District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC9629,690.58
District of Columbia Department of Human Services, Washington, DC72,164.94
Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind, Riverdale, MD13642,061.65
Florida
Florida State Department of Education, Tampa1,818562,265.31
Florida State Department of Education, PNP, Tampa10131,236.96
Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind, St. Augustine20964,638.86
Division of Blind Services, Daytona Beach5717,628.78
Miami Lighthouse for the Blind, Inc., Miami319,587.58
Conklin Centers for the Blind, Daytona Beach319,587.58
Georgia
Georgia State Department of Education, Clarkston1,040321,647.92
Georgia State Department of Education, PNP, Clarkston92,783.49
Georgia Academy for the Blind, Macon11334,948.28
Center for the Visually Impaired, Atlanta5918,247.33
East Central Regional Hospital, Gracewood51,546.38
Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehabilitation1309.28
Guam
Guam Department of Education, Hagatña226,804.09
Hawaii
Hawaii Department of Education, Honolulu17855,051.28
Hawaii Department of Education, PNP, Honolulu3410,515.41
Hawaii Center for the Deaf and the Blind, Honolulu41,237.11
Idaho
Idaho State Department of Education, Gooding24977,009.94
Idaho State Department of Education, PNP, Gooding41,237.11
Idaho School for the Deaf and the Blind, Gooding206,185.54
Idaho Commission for the Blind, Boise154,639.15
Idaho State School and Hospital, Nampa51,546.38
Illinois
Illinois State Board of Education, Chicago1,831566,285.91
Illinois State Board of Education, PNP, Chicago545168,555.88
Illinois School for the Visually Impaired, Jacksonville10331,855.52
The Hadley School for the Blind, Winnetka988305,565.53
The Chicago Lighthouse for People Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired, Chicago26983,195.47
Illinois Center for Rehabilitation and Education—Wood, Chicago298,969.03
The Hope School, Springfield113,402.05
Indiana
Indiana Department of Education, Indianapolis733226,699.93
Indiana Department of Education, PNP, Indianapolis82,474.21
Indiana School for the Blind, Indianapolis12037,113.22
Indiana Department of Education, Adult Students, Indianapolis8024,742.15
Iowa
Iowa Department of Education, Des Moines433133,916.88
Iowa Department of Education, PNP, Des Moines3927.83
Iowa Braille and Sight Saving School, Vinton154,639.15
Iowa Department for the Blind, Des Moines123,711.32
Glenwood Resource Center, Glenwood3510,824.69
Kansas
Kansas State Board of Education, Kansas City439135,772.54
Kansas State Board of Education, PNP, Kansas City13942,989.48
Kansas State School for the Blind, Kansas City4413,608.18
Services for the Blind, Topeka3927.83
Kentucky
Kentucky Department of Education, Louisville579179,071.30
Kentucky Department of Education, PNP, Louisville5316,391.67
Kentucky School for the Blind, Louisville5817,938.06
Kentucky Department for the Blind, Louisville247,422.64
Louisiana
Louisiana Department of Education, Baton Rouge390120,617.97
Louisiana Department of Education, PNP, Baton Rouge41,237.11
Louisiana School for the Visually Impaired, Baton Rouge7924,432.87
Louisiana Center for the Blind, Ruston9529,386.30
The Lighthouse for the Blind in New Orleans Inc., New Orleans1309.28
Maine
Maine Division for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Bangor18858,144.05
Maine Division for the Blind and Visually Impaired, PNP, Bangor3927.83
Maryland
Maryland State Department of Education, Baltimore744230,101.98
Maryland State Department of Education, PNP, Baltimore16751,649.23
The Maryland School for the Blind, Baltimore16049,484.30
Massachusetts
Massachusetts Department of Education, Malden1,363421,544.34
Massachusetts Department of Education, PNP, Malden6118,865.89
Perkins School for the Blind - Infants and Toddlers, Watertown354109,484.00
The Carroll Center for the Blind, Newton226,804.09
Massachusetts Association for the Blind, Brookline164,948.43
Massachusetts Commission for the Blind, Boston397122,782.91
Walter E. Fernald State School, Waltham5015,463.84
Perkins School for the Blind - Scholl Programs, Watertown14845,772.97
Michigan
Michigan State Department of Education, Flint2,021625,048.51
Michigan Commission for the Blind Training Center, Kalamazoo22368,968.74
Visually Handicapped Services/Detroit Receiving Hospital and University Health Center, Detroit113,402.05
Michigan State Department of Education, PNP, Flint278,350.47
Minnesota
Minnesota Department of Education, Faribault779240,926.66
Minnesota Department of Education, PNP, Faribault92,783.49
Minnesota State Academy for the Blind, Faribault4112,680.35
Blind, Inc., Minneapolis113,402.05
Vision Loss Resources, Minneapolis134,020.60
Duluth Lighthouse for the Blind1309.28
Mississippi
Mississippi State Department of Education, Jackson17554,123.45
Mississippi School for the Blind, Jackson8325,669.98
Addie McBryde Rehabilitation Center for the Blind, Jackson144,329.88
Missouri
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, St. Louis932288,246.02
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, PNP, St. Louis18858,144.05
Missouri School for the Blind, St. Louis7222,267.93
Alphapointe Association for the Blind, Kansas City309,278.31
Missouri Family Support Division, Jefferson City268,041.20
Montana
Montana State Department of Public Instruction, Great Falls17754,742.00
Montana State Department of Public Instruction, PNP, Great Falls82,474.21
Montana School for the Deaf and the Blind, Great Falls144,329.88
Nebraska
Nebraska State Department of Education, Nebraska City400123,710.74
Nebraska State Department of Education, PNP, Nebraska City3927.83
Nebraska Center for the Education of Children Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired, Nebraska City113,402.05
Nevada
Nevada Department of Education, Carson City31798,040.76
New Hampshire
New Hampshire Department of Education, Concord15848,865.74
New Jersey
New Jersey Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Newark1,566484,327.54
St. Joseph's School for the Blind, Jersey City11034,020.45
New Mexico
New Mexico State Department of Education, Alamogordo471145,669.40
New Mexico State Department of Education, PNP, Alamogordo92,783.49
New Mexico School for the Visually Handicapped, Alamogordo8927,525.64
New York
New York State Education Department, Batavia2,778859,171.08
New York State Education Department, PNP, Batavia1,206372,987.88
Lavelle School for the Blind, Bronx11234,639.01
The New York Institute for Special Education, Bronx10131,236.96
New York State School for the Blind, Batavia5717,628.78
Helen Keller National Center, Sands Point247,422.64
North Carolina
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, Raleigh978302,472.76
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, PNP, Raleigh406125,566.40
The Governor Morehead School, Raleigh334103,298.47
Division of Services for the Blind, Raleigh206,185.54
North Dakota
Department of Public Instruction, Grand Forks14745,463.70
Department of Public Instruction, PNP, Grand Forks134,020.60
North Dakota School for the Blind, Grand Forks7322,577.21
Northern Mariana Islands
Department of Education175.257.71
Ohio
Ohio State Department of Education, Columbus1,460451,544.20
Ohio State Department of Education, PNP, Columbus103,092.77
Ohio State School for the Blind, Columbus9328,762.75
Oklahoma
Oklahoma Department of Education, Oklahoma City903279,276.99
Oklahoma School for the Blind, Muskogee7924,432.87
Oregon
Oregon Department of Education, Salem579179,071.30
Oregon State School for the Blind, Salem268,041.20
Oregon Department of Education, PNP, Salem247,422.64
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg1,638506,595.48
Pennsylvania Department of Education, PNP, Harrisburg216,494.81
Overbrook School for the Blind, Philadelphia379117,215.93
Western Pennsylvania School for Blind Children, Pittsburgh17052,577.06
Blind & Vision Rehabilitation Services of Pittsburgh, Homestead3310,206.14
Royer-Greaves School for the Blind, Paoli288,659.75
Puerto Rico
Puerto Rico Department of Education, San Juan711219,895.84
Puerto Rico Department of Education, PNP, San Juan134,020.60
Instituto Loaiza Cordero Para Niños Ciegos, Santurce8927,525.64
Rehabilitation Center for the Blind of Puerto Rico, San Juan3310,206.14
Rhode Island
Rhode Island Department of Education, Providence13942,989.48
Rhode Island Department of Education, PNP, Providence4814,845.29
South Carolina
South Carolina Department of Education, Florence466144,123.01
South Carolina School for the Deaf, Blind, and Multihandicapped, Columbia23472,370.78
South Carolina Commission for the Blind, Columbia298,969.03
South Carolina School for the Deaf, Blind, and Multihandicapped, PNP, Columbia5115,773.12
South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs, Columbia489151,236.38
South Dakota
South Dakota Department of Education, Pierre7422,886.49
South Dakota School for the Blind & Visually Impaired, Aberdeen14344,226.59
South Dakota Rehabilitation Center for the Blind, Sioux Falls82,474.21
Tennessee
Tennessee State Department of Education, Nashville872269,689.41
Tennessee State Department of Education, PNP, Nashville4112,680.35
Tennessee School for the Blind, Nashville15848,865.74
Texas
Texas Education Agency, PNP, Austin1309.28
Texas Education Agency, Austin4,8081,487,003.09
Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Austin12538,659.61
The Lighthouse for the Blind of Houston, Houston5717,628.78
Criss Cole Rehabilitation Center, Austin5416,700.95
Texas Department of Mental Health/Mental Retardation, Austin738228,246.31
Utah
Utah State Office of Education, Ogden462142,885.90
Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind, Ogden20162,164.65
Vermont
Vermont State Department of Education, Burlington13942,989.48
Virgin Islands
Virgin Islands Department of Education, Christiansted, St. Thomas164,948.43
Virginia
Virginia Department of Education, Richmond1,050324,740.69
Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind—Staunton, Staunton309,278.31
Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, Richmond9429,072.02
Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, PNP, Richmond206,185.54
Washington
Washington State Department of Public Instruction, Vancouver878271,545.07
Washington State Department of Public Instruction, PNP, Vancouver6219,175.16
Washington State School for the Blind, Vancouver4212,989.63
West Virginia
West Virginia State Department of Education, Romney25277,937.77
West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and the Blind, Romney8827,216.36
West Virginia State Department of Education, PNP, Romney3927.83
Wisconsin
Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Madison722223,297.88
Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, PNP, Madison195,876.26
Wisconsin School for the Visually Handicapped and Educational Services for the Visually Impaired, Janesville4212,989.63
Wyoming
Wyoming Department of Education, Sheridan9328,762.75
Wyoming Department of Education, PNP, Sheridan6018,556.61
Totals59,35518,357,127.33

DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENT

Department of Development and Magazine Services

Photo of hands reading brailleReader's Digest® in Braille provides vital information to readers. Your kind gift will help thousands of children and adults who are blind or visually impaired. For more information, please call us toll free, 1-888-295-2405, or visit our website, www.aph.org, click "Donate Now and Support Our Mission."



HELPING BLIND PEOPLE BECOME MORE INDEPENDENT

Across the U.S., people who are blind or visually impaired receive free-of-charge accessible magazines from the American Printing House for the Blind (APH). These magazines contain vital information that helps people who are blind or visually impaired become more independent. APH's magazine program, which has been serving Americans for over 80 years, is possible because of generous donors from all walks of life.

ACCESSIBLE MAGAZINES OFFERED BY APH

Braille Reader's Digest®
For decades, Reader's Digest® has been one of the most popular magazines in the world. Since 1928, our nation's blind citizens have been able to receive Reader's Digest® in braille from APH.

Recorded Reader's Digest®
Reader's Digest® in recorded form has been offered by APH since 1939. Like the braille edition, the recorded Reader's Digest® is available free to eligible readers.

Newsweek® Talking Magazine
Newsweek® on cassette has been offered by APH since 1959. Newsweek listeners rely on the in-depth current affairs coverage provided each week by APH at nearly the same time as the print edition. Recorded Newsweek is offered free-of-charge to eligible readers.

Weekly Reader® Series
Weekly Reader® in both braille and large print started in 1946 and is mailed each week to hundreds of students. As the regular print version reaches schools nationwide, the braille and large print editions from APH are also available.

Do you know someone who might be eligible for accessible magazines? Call APH toll-free for more information: 1-888-295-2405.

HOW YOU CAN HELP

There are several ways you can help visually impaired readers receive the essential information that they need:

PLANNING WITH GIFT ANNUITIES

Caring individuals use Charitable Gift Annuities (CGA) to provide major financial support to APH.

The Charitable Gift Annuity is a popular estate-planning tool that provides income for life and very favorable tax results. Other features of a Charitable Gift Annuity include:

HOW TO RECEIVE GIFT ANNUITY INFORMATION

If you would like to receive further details, or an obligation-free proposal on APH's Charitable Gift Annuity program or learn more about Wills and Estate Planning, please contact the APH Development Department at 1-888-295-2405.

WILLS

Remembering APH in your Will provides a legacy toward our mission of helping those who are blind and visually impaired.

If you wish to make APH the recipient of a personal bequest, please use our full name, "American Printing House for the Blind, Inc."

Living Legacy Society: Donors who have informed us of their decision to include APH in their Will or estate plans have the opportunity to be recognized as members of our 1858 Living Legacy Society. Each member's medallion is custom engraved with the donor's name and is displayed in the foyer of The Museum of the American Printing House for the Blind.

Always consult your lawyer before making or changing your Will.

The American Printing House for the Blind, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. Gifts are tax-deductible.

®Registered trademarks of The Reader's Digest Association, Inc.; Newsweek, Inc.; and Weekly Reader Corp.

DONATE SECURELY ONLINE VIA PAYPAL

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For your convenience, APH now accepts donations online via PayPal. You may make either a one-time or recurring donation: just go to www.aph.org and click "Donate Now and Support our Mission."

PayPal is the internet's most trusted and convenient tool for online donations. You can make a donation through your PayPal account, use a debit card, or any major credit card. A PayPal account is not required.

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