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Go to navigation for APH Annual Report 2011

Annual Report 2011: Administration of the Federal Appropriation

October 1, 2010 – September 30, 2011



Secretary’s Report

2011 Formal Meeting of Ex Officio Trustees

The 143rd Formal Meeting of the Ex Officio Trustees of the American Printing House the Blind (APH) convened at 12:40 p.m., October 15, 2011, at the Galt House Hotel in Louisville, Kentucky. The following conferees were present:

Ex Officio Trustee Attendees

Special Guests (Invited by Dr. Tuck Tinsley)

APH Staff Attendees

Minutes of Business Meeting

The meeting was opened with a welcome from Dr. Tuck Tinsley III, President and member of APH’s Board of Trustees. Ex Officio Trustees and APH staff in attendance introduced themselves and the organizations and departments they represented.

Comments Regarding FY2011

Dr. Tinsley provided a brief state-of-the-company report, and then commented on several issues, including the following:

Dr. Tinsley recognized Annette Reichman, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Washington, DC, for her eloquent and informative keynote address presented at the opening session of the 2011 APH Annual Meeting.

APH staff members were commended for their contributions, and Ex Officio Trustees were recognized for their contributions as well as for their attendance at the 2011 APH Annual Meeting.

Approval of Advisory Committee Reports

Stacy Grandt, Chair of the Education Products Advisory Committee (EPAC) and Ex Officio Trustee representing the Wisconsin School for the Visually Handicapped and Educational Services for the Vision Impaired; and Marjorie Kaiser, Chair of the Education Services Advisory Committee (ESAC) and Ex Officio Trustee representing the South Dakota School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, recognized each of their respective committee members and requested approval of their committee reports previously distributed to the Ex Officio Trustees. A motion to accept the reports as offered was made, seconded, and passed unanimously.

Approval of Committee Nominees

Suzanne Dalton, Chair of the Nominations Committee and Ex Officio Trustee representing the Florida State Department of Education, presented the committee’s slate of nominees for Advisory Committee members and chairpersons as follows:

A motion to accept the Nominations Committee’s recommendations was made, seconded, and unanimously passed.

Recognition of Retiring Advisory Committee Members

Bob Brasher and Janie Blome recognized the retiring Chairs of the Advisory Committees: Marjorie Kaiser for ESAC in 2011 and Stacy Grandt for EPAC in 2011. Also recognized were the alternate members of both Advisory Committees, Suzanne Dalton, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Florida Instructional Materials Center, for EPAC in 2011; and Barbara McCarthy, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Virginia Library and Resource Center and the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, for ESAC in 2011.

Dr. Tinsley provided the closing remarks. The 2011 Formal Meeting of the Ex Officio Trustees of APH was adjourned at 1:45 p.m.

Respectfully submitted,

Bill Beavin
Secretary

Note: Full reports of the Ex Officio Trustee Advisory Committees are provided in this annual report.

Memories from the 2011 APH Annual Meeting “Running Strong Since 1858”

Group portrait

Ralph Brewer, Superintendent Emeritus of the Tennessee School for the Blind, received APH’s highest honor, the Wings of Freedom Award. Here Brewer poses with (left) Burt Boyer (APH) and Tuck Tinsley.

APH Annual Meeting 2011 Photo Album

See pictures from the 143rd Annual Meeting of Ex Officio Trustees and Special Guests.

About the APH Annual Meeting of Ex Officio Trustees

Held in Louisville each fall, Annual Meeting provides opportunities for Ex Officio Trustees to meet with APH staff, learn about new products, share input on upcoming products, help guide the direction of the APH (by participating on an Advisory Committee), and to meet other Trustees from across the U.S. APH also encourages and appreciates the participation by our many “Special Guests” who include teachers, parents, consumers, university program personnel, and other important groups of service providers.

Annual Meeting Is Mandated by the Act

In 1879, the U.S. Congress passed the Act to Promote the Education of the Blind. This act created the Federal Quota system to provide educational materials for blind students and named the American Printing House for the Blind as the national source of these materials. Part of that system requires that the Federal Quota program administrators—the Ex Officio Trustees—meet each year.

The advice and counsel of Trustees is crucial to help APH meet the needs of blind students. Participation in the meeting is one of the main responsibilities of an Ex Officio Trustee.


Reports from the Advisory Committees

Reports of the Advisory Committees to the Ex Officio Trustees of the American Printing House for the Blind for Fiscal Year 2011.

Group portrait

The Ex Officio Trustee Nominations Committee 2011 (left to right): Chair Suzanne Dalton (FL), Karen Ross (MA) and Nancy Niebrugge (CA).

Formal Report: 2011 Nominations Committee for Ex Officio Trustee Advisory Committees

The members of the 2011 Nominations Committee are:

Members of the Committee are honored to have been asked to perform the important assignment of nominating Ex Officio Trustees to serve on APH’s two Advisory Committees.

The Educational Products Advisory Committee and the Educational Services Advisory Committee support APH in the organization’s continuous improvement process, focusing on providing quality products and services that effectively meet the needs of our field. Ex Officio Trustees benefit and contribute through service on the Advisory Committees; the experience is an opportunity to learn about APH and to impact its important work.

Advisory Committee members are nominated with the following in mind:

The 2011 Nominations Committee recommended the following slate that was unanimously approved at the Formal Meeting of the Ex Officio Trustees convened on October 15, 2011 in Louisville, Kentucky:

Educational Products Advisory Committee

Chair for a one-year term:

Marty McKenzie, Ex Officio Trustee representing the South Carolina School for the Deaf, Blind and Multihandicapped

For three-year terms as committee members:

Collette Bauman, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Michigan State Department of Education and the Michigan School for the Blind;
Stephanie Bissonette, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Vermont State Department of Education

Alternate for a one-year term:

Todd Reeves, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Western Pennsylvania School for Blind Children

The full 2011-2012 Educational Products Advisory Committee will be: (The year preceding the name indicates the final year of regular committee tenure.)

The Educational Services Advisory Committee

Chair for a one-year term:

Jonn Paris-Salb, Ex Officio Trustee representing the California Department of Education

For two-year terms as committee members:

Julie Kagy, Ex Officio Trustee representing the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction; Charlotte Lowry, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind

Alternate for a one-year term:

Sally Gittinger, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Nebraska Center for the Education of Children Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

The full 2011-2012 Educational Services Advisory Committee will be: (The year preceding the name indicates the final year of regular committee tenure.)

The Nominations Committee thanks the new and returning Advisory Committee members and chairs for their willingness to serve. We encourage all interested Ex Officio Trustees to declare your interest to be a future Advisory Committee member; it is the single most important way to contribute as an Ex Officio Trustee.

Respectfully submitted,

Suzanne Dalton, Chair
Suzanne Dalton portrait
Nancy Niebrugge and Karen Ross, Members of the Nominations Committee
Louisville, Kentucky
October 15, 2011

Report of the Educational Services Advisory Committee

Report of the Educational Services Advisory Committee to the Trustees of the American Printing House for the Blind for Fiscal Year 2011

Group portrait

The Ex Officio Trustee Educational Services Advisory Committee as of May, 2011: Jim Olson (CO), Sally Giitinger (NE), Jonn Paris-Salb (CA), Marje Kaiser (SD), Patrick Clancy (IA).

Purpose of ESAC

The purpose of the Educational Services Advisory Committee (ESAC) is to:

Introduction to the ESAC Report

In April of 2011, the Educational Services Advisory Committee (ESAC) met in Louisville, KY at the American Printing House for the Blind (APH). The ESAC committee met to address the 2010 ESAC report and to develop commendations and recommendations. To assist with this endeavor, interactive presentations were made by APH’s administrative staff and ESAC committee members. These interactive presentations provided progress updates on the 2010 recommendations, operations, and information on new initiatives.

ESAC Commendations 2011

Consistent with the Act to Promote the Education of the Blind (1879), the committee commends APH for:

  1. Providing EOTs with state-specific information with the Leaders to Leaders packet so EOTs can educate policymakers and stakeholders about the APH products and services.
  2. Increasing and improving communication through social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, Flickr, YouTube, and the award-winning Fred’s Head blog.
  3. Expanding the use of webinars and training videos to promote and educate on the use of APH products and services.
  4. Integrating the National Instructional Materials Access Center (NIMAC) and Louis databases for improved file access.
  5. Cataloging and digitizing the Barr, Bledsoe, and Migel library collections to expand access.
  6. Upgrading the Student Registration System (SRS) to identify possible duplication of student records in Phase 1.
  7. Utilizing EOT expertise on ad hoc committees to recommend improvements for the file repository and the Louis database.
  8. Implementing the interdepartmental travel committee to determine outreach participation by the APH staff.
  9. Improving the format and content of the monthly APH News.
  10. Redesigning the APH website which includes the left sidebar for navigation and the changeable billboard.
  11. Exceeding original projections to expand the NIMAC collection that now includes more than 24,000 assets.

ESAC Recommendations 2011

Consistent with the Act to Promote the Education of the Blind (1879), the committee recommends that APH:

  1. Establish an ad hoc committee (similar to the File Repository and Louis committees) to facilitate a process with EOTs to improve electronic submission of student data.
  2. Provide additional resources and training for EOTs with consideration of those who do not have education and/or experience in the field of vision.
  3. Continue to expand the utilization of EOTs to support and promote the APH mission by:
    • Creating ad hoc committees as needed
    • Requesting student and teacher success stories using APH products
    • Requesting innovative uses and lesson plans of APH products
    • Recruiting EOTs to promote APH products and services at regional events.
  4. Build in opportunities for EOTs to meet in small work groups during Annual Meeting to share best practices.
  5. Partner with agencies such as the U.S. Department of Education (DOE), Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA), and National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE) to align services and products with national priorities.
  6. Share the benefits and results of the Executive in Residence program and its contributions to APH’s mission.
  7. Expand the promotion of the various collections of materials and artifacts.
  8. Increase the Tactile Graphic Image Library by actively recruiting the submission of images.
  9. Follow up with APH Scholars regarding the impact of Annual Meeting participation on their role in the field.

Respectfully submitted,

Portrait
Marjorie Kaiser, Chair
Educational Services Advisory Committee

Report of the Educational Products Advisory Committee

Report of the Educational Products Advisory Committee to the Trustees of the American Printing House for the Blind for Fiscal Year 2011

Portrait

The Ex Officio Trustee Educational Products Advisory Committee as of May, 2011: Paula Mauro (OH); Yvonne Ali (MO); Stacy Grandt (WI) Chair; Carmen Grove-Suminski (ND); Todd Reeves (PA); and Linda Lyles (NM)

Purpose of EPAC

The purpose of the Educational Products Advisory Committee (EPAC) is:

Introduction to EPAC Report

In May of 2011, the Educational Products Advisory Committee (EPAC) met for the tenth year as a formal advisory body to the American Printing House for the Blind (APH). Committee members met with several APH employees and sincerely appreciated the candid, forthright, and transparent discussions. An undercurrent of passion and commitment to advance the interests of children with visual impairments is palpable at all levels of the organization – a fitting tribute to the legacy of this organization and an irreplaceable source of confidence in its future.

EPAC Commendations 2011

  1. Focusing on involving parents in the education of their children by producing parent-friendly products. APH encourages parental participation as evidenced by the development of early literacy products such as the Flip-over Concept Books and the Early Braille Trade Books (EBT). Additionally, the proposed new parents’ manual on Cortical Visual Impairment (CVI) and the emergent literacy books for parents of children aged birth through three will be particularly empowering for parents.
  2. Transforming and modernizing core curriculum products by 1.) Aligning products to meet national standards, 2.) Following national trends in education, and 3.) Incorporating promising practices in the field of vision impairment as well as changes to the braille code. Examples of such products include MathBuilders, Focus in Math, Geometro, Building on Patterns, Early Braille Trade Books, Quick Check Index of Literary Braille Signs, APH Talking PC Maps, Sense of Science Astronomy, Life Science Tactile Graphics, and Book Port Plus™.
  3. Its growing commitment to the entire population of students with visual impairments by promoting universal design in product development. Project leaders increasingly consider of the needs of students with visual impairment, including those with multiple disabilities, from the initiation of conceptual design through various stages of product development.
  4. Developing the finest products available through utilization of external experts. EPAC is particularly impressed with the national and international collaborations established to aid in product development, as well as the implementation of the Executive in Residence Program.
  5. Developing and increasing the market for adult-related products thereby, enhancing the independent living skills for older, transitioning students and adults (i.e., resources in non-verbal communications, parenting, orientation and mobility, diabetes education, daily living skills, and APH Talking PC Maps).
  6. Its excellent, passionate staff. Consistently, both APH staff and leadership recognize the importance of their work in helping shape the future of the students and families that their products support. They are not afraid to think critically, to ask difficult questions, to challenge current ways of thinking and to search for less traditional solutions that may meet multiple needs. The staff’s commitment to continuous improvement through rigorous research, collaboration, and internal and external team building all result in a staff that is willing to stretch themselves individually so that APH might grow collectively. One of APH’s greatest strengths lies in the quality of the men and women who call APH “home.”
  7. Developing products that have synergy and build upon one another to support student achievement (i.e., TADPOLE/ToAD/ISAVE; Early Braille Trade Books/EBT database/Building on Patterns).

EPAC Recommendations 2011

  1. Continue to work expeditiously to maintain the momentum that has been seen in the Building on Patterns project. APH has allocated significant resources to support this project, and the product is a strong curriculum to support literacy outcomes for students. It is further recommended that APH establish a systematic process for periodic revision of this curriculum.
  2. Establish a process to gather data that ensures support from Trustees before allocating resources to develop high cost technology products.
  3. Actively seek product feedback from various multi-disciplinary team members. EPAC made this recommendation in 2010 and APH’s implementation will support a growing commitment to the universal design of its products to meet the needs of students with multiple disabilities.
  4. Analyze the timeline to identify and correct bottlenecks that slow down production efficiency. Provide data to EPAC members during their annual visit that addresses 1.) Projected time for development of project; 2.) Actual timeline for product through each area of development and production.
  5. Replicate promising practices currently found within the company as a way to establish consistent processes that yield results (i.e. the Product Development Committee meetings).

Respectfully Submitted,

Portrait
Stacy Grandt, Chair
Educational Products Advisory Committee 2011

Addendum to the Advisory Committee Reports, Provided by APH

Book cover

The Best for a Nest is a fun storybook with a storyboard and manipulative objects that helps blind children with many concepts, including the use of tactile symbols.

APH Products Approved for Purchase with Federal Quota Funds, FY2011

Distribution of Eligible Students

Based on the Federal Quota Census of January 4, 2010 (FY2011)

Distribution of Eligible Students, Fiscal Year 2011

The Federal Quota Program was initiated in 1879 by the Federal Act to Promote the Education of the Blind. This program is a means whereby a per capita amount of money is designated for the purchase of educational materials for each eligible student registered through an established Federal Quota account. These Federal Quota accounts are maintained and administered by the American Printing House for the Blind (APH) and its Ex Officio Trustees.

The Federal Quota Registration is the census that records students who are eligible to receive materials provided by the Federal Act to Promote the Education of the Blind. This census is conducted through the Advisory Services portion of the act.

Distribution of Eligible Students, Fiscal Year 2011

Appropriate Use of Federal Quota Census Data

The specific purpose of the annual Federal Quota Census is to register students in the United States and outlying areas who meet the definition of blindness and are, therefore, eligible for adapted educational materials from APH through the Act to Promote the Education of the Blind.

Statements regarding student literacy, use of appropriate learning media, and students taught in a specific medium cannot be supported using APH registration data.

Agencies Receiving Federal Quota Funds

Agencies for the Education of the Visually Impaired in the United States Receiving Federal Quota Funds Due Under an Act to Promote the Education of the Blind, Fiscal Year 2011

Note: The agencies listed in this section are in the following order within each state: State Departments of Education, Schools for the Blind, Rehabilitation Programs, Programs for Students with Multiple Disabilities.

*Note: The abbreviation "PNP" means "Private, Non-profit."

Alabama

Alabama State Department of Education, Talladega 943 $340,978.63
Alabama State Department of Education, *PNP, Talladega 74 26,757.60
Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind, Talladega 322 116,431.73

Alaska

Alaska State Department of Education, Anchorage 158 57,131.10

American Samoa

American Samoa Department of Education, Pago Pago 11 3,977.48

Arizona

Arizona State Department of Education, Phoenix 788 284,932.30
Arizona State Department of Education, PNP, Phoenix 252 91,120.48
Arizona State Schools for the Deaf and the Blind, Tucson 268 96,905.91

Arkansas

Arkansas State Department of Education, Sherwood 287 103,776.10
Arkansas State Department of Education, PNP, Sherwood 35 12,655.62
Arkansas School for the Blind, Little Rock 113 40,859.58
Lions World Services for the Blind, Little Rock 32 11,570.85
Conway Human Development Center, Conway 73 26,396.01

California

California Department of Education, Sacramento 4,989 1,803,968.58
California Department of Education, PNP, Sacramento 639 231,055.51
California School for the Blind, Fremont 65 23,503.30
Braille Institute of America Inc, Los Angeles 48 17,356.28
Orientation Center for the Blind, Fremont 19 6,870.19

Colorado

Colorado Department of Education, Colorado Springs 632 228,524.38
Colorado Department of Education, PNP, Colorado Springs 153 55,323.15
Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind, Colorado Springs 68 24,588.07
Rehabilitation Center, Denver 38 13,740.39

Connecticut

Board of Education & Services for the Blind, Windsor 647 233,948.22
Board of Education & Services for the Blind, PNP, Windsor 4 1,446.36
Oak Hill School, Hartford 18 6,508.61
Connecticut State Department of Developmental Services, Hartford 77 27,842.37

Delaware

State Department of Education, New Castle 188 67,978.77
State Department of Education, PNP, New Castle 2 723.18
Division for the Visually Impaired, New Castle 5 1,807.95

District of Columbia

District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington 93 33,627.80
District of Columbia Department of Human Services, Washington 8 2,892.71

Florida

Florida State Department of Education, Tampa 1,821 658,453.95
Florida State Department of Education, PNP, Tampa 109 39,413.22
Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind, St. Augustine 231 83,527.11
Division of Blind Services, Daytona Beach 58 20,972.17
Miami Lighthouse for the Blind, Inc., Miami 36 13,017.21
Conklin Centers for the Blind, Daytona Beach 47 16,994.69

Georgia

Georgia State Department of Education, Clarkston 1,195 432,099.11
Georgia State Department of Education, PNP, Clarkston 9 3,254.30
Georgia Academy for the Blind, Macon 93 33,627.80
Center for the Visually Impaired, Atlanta 63 22,780.12
East Central Regional Hospital, Gracewood 3 1,084.77

Guam

Guam Department of Education, Hagåtña 31 11,209.27

Hawaii

Hawaii Department of Education, Honolulu 174 62,916.52
Hawaii Department of Education, PNP, Honolulu 25 9,039.73
Hawaii Center for the Deaf and the Blind, Honolulu 3 1,084.77

Idaho

Idaho State Department of Education, Gooding 245 88,589.36
Idaho State Department of Education, PNP, Gooding 3 1,084.77
Idaho School for the Deaf and the Blind, Gooding 24 8,678.14
Idaho Commission for the Blind, Boise 15 5,423.84
Idaho State School and Hospital 3 1,084.77

Illinois

Illinois State Board of Education, Chicago 1,841 665,685.74
Illinois State Board of Education, PNP, Chicago 522 188,749.57
Illinois School for the Visually Impaired, Jacksonville 99 35,797.33
The Hadley School for the Blind, Winnetka 997 360,504.44
The Chicago Lighthouse for People who are Blind or Visually Impaired, Chicago 287 103,776.10
Illinois Center for Rehabilitation and Education — Wood, Chicago 53 19,164.23
The Hope School, Springfield 13 4,700.66

Indiana

Indiana Department of Education, Indianapolis 684 247,327.02
Indiana Department of Education, PNP, Indianapolis 5 1,807.95
Indiana School for the Blind, Indianapolis 108 39,051.63
Indiana Department of Education—Adult Students, Indianapolis 80 28,927.14

Iowa

Iowa Department of Education, Vinton 419 151,505.88
Iowa Department of Education, PNP, Vinton 17 6,147.02
Iowa Braille and Sight Saving School, Vinton 7 2,531.12
Iowa Department for the Blind, Glenwood 34 12,294.03
Glenwood Resource Center, Glenwood 6 2,169.54

Kansas

Kansas State Board of Education, Kansas City 491 177,540.30
Kansas State Board of Education, PNP, Kansas City 135 48,814.54
Kansas State School for the Blind, Kansas City 44 15,909.93

Kentucky

Kentucky Department of Education, Louisville 589 212,976.04
Kentucky Department of Education, PNP, Louisville 51 18,441.05
Kentucky School for the Blind, Louisville 56 20,249.00
Kentucky Department for the Blind, Louisville 18 6,508.61

Louisiana

Louisiana Department of Education, Baton Rouge 336 121,493.97
Louisiana Department of Education, PNP, Baton Rouge 2 723.18
Louisiana School for the Visually Impaired, Baton Rouge 73 26,396.01
Louisiana Center for the Blind, Ruston 88 31,819.85
The Lighthouse for the Blind in New Orleans Inc., New Orleans 8 2,892.71

Maine

Maine Division for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Bangor 161 58,215.86
Maine Division for the Blind and Visually Impaired, PNP, Bangor 11 3,977.48

Maryland

Maryland State Department of Education, Baltimore 699 252,750.86
Maryland State Department of Education, PNP, Baltimore 139 50,260.90
The Maryland School for the Blind, Baltimore 177 64,001.29
Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind, Riverdale 27 9,762.91

Massachusetts

Massachusetts Department of Education, Malden 1,296 468,619.62
Massachusetts Department of Education, PNP, Malden 40 14,463.57
Perkins School for the Blind—Infants and Toddlers, Watertown 250 90,397.30
The Carroll Center for the Blind, Newton 21 7,593.37
Massachusetts Association for the Blind, Brookline 15 5,423.84
Massachusetts Commission for the Blind, Boston 532 192,365.46
Perkins School for the Blind—School Programs, Watertown 138 49,899.31

Michigan

Michigan Department of Education, Flint 1,948 704,375.78
Michigan Department of Education, PNP, Flint 22 7,954.96
Visually Handicapped Services/Detroit Receiving Hospital and University Health Center, Detroit 20 7,231.78
Michigan Commission for the Blind Training Center, Kalamazoo 211 76,295.32

Minnesota

Minnesota Department of Education, Roseville 777 280,954.82
Minnesota Department of Education, PNP, Roseville 8 2,892.71
Minnesota State Academy for the Blind, Faribault 50 18,079.46
Blind, Inc., Minneapolis 15 5,423.84
Vision Loss Resources, Minneapolis 4 1,446.36
Duluth Lighthouse for the Blind, Duluth 3 1,084.77

Mississippi

Mississippi State Department of Education, Jackson 222 80,272.80
Mississippi School for the Blind, Jackson 79 28,565.55
Addie McBryde Rehabilitation Center for the Blind, Jackson 17 6,147.02
Reach Center for the Blind, Tupelo 6 2,169.54

Missouri

Department of Elementary & Secondary Education, St. Louis 963 348,210.41
Department of Elementary & Secondary Education, PNP, St. Louis 193 69,786.72
Missouri School for the Blind, St. Louis 63 22,780.12
Alphapointe Association for the Blind, Kansas City 32 11,570.85
Department of Social Services, Family Support Division, Jeffersion City 19 6,870.19

Montana

Montana State Department of Public Instruction, Great Falls 195 70,509.90
Montana State Department of Public Instruction, PNP, Great Falls 2 723.18
Montana School for the Deaf and the Blind, Great Falls 14 5,062.25

Nebraska

Nebraska State Department of Education, Nebraska City 380 137,403.90
Nebraska State Department of Education, PNP, Nebraska City 5 1,807.95
Nebraska Center for the Education of Children Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired, Nebraska City 13 4,700.66

Nevada

Nevada Department of Education, Carson City 348 125,833.05

New Hampshire

New Hampshire Department of Education, Concord 141 50,984.08
New Hampshire Department of Education, PNP, Concord 17 6,147.02

New Jersey

New Jersey Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Newark 1,451 524,665.94
St. Joseph’s School for the Blind/Concordia Learning Center, Jersey City 136 49,176.13

New Mexico

New Mexico State Department of Education, Alamogordo 518 187,303.21
New Mexico State Department of Education, PNP, Alamogordo 11 3,977.48
New Mexico School for the Visually Handicapped, Alamogordo 98 35,435.74

New York

New York State Education Department, Batavia 2,757 996,901.45
New York State Education Department, PNP, Batavia 1,201 434,268.64
Lavelle School for the Blind, Bronx 110 39,774.81
The New York Institute for Special Education, Bronx 112 40,497.99
New York State School for the Blind, Batavia 53 19,164.23
Helen Keller National Center 27 9,762.91

North Carolina

North Carolina Department of Public Education, Raleigh 1,115 403,171.97
North Carolina Department of Public Education, PNP, Raleigh 391 141,381.38
The Governor Morehead School, Raleigh 334 120,770.80
Division of Services for the Blind, Raleigh 21 7,593.37

North Dakota

Department of Public Instruction, Grand Forks 171 61,831.75
Department of Public Instruction, PNP, Grand Forks 13 4,700.66
North Dakota School for the Blind, Grand Forks 74 26,757.60

Northern Mariana Islands

Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands (CNMI) Department of Education 19 6,870.19

Ohio

Ohio State Department of Education, Columbus 1,525 551,423.55
Ohio State Department of Education, PNP, Columbus 31 11,209.27
Ohio State School for the Blind, Columbus 98 35,435.74

Oklahoma

Oklahoma Department of Education, Oklahoma City 687 248,411.79
Oklahoma School for the Blind, Muskogee 83 30,011.90

Oregon

Oregon Department of Education, Salem 616 222,738.95
Oregon Department of Education, PNP, Salem 27 9,762.91

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg 1,681 607,831.46
Pennsylvania Department of Education, PNP, Harrisburg 19 6,870.19
Overbrook School for the Blind, Philadelphia 413 149,336.34
Western Pennsylvania School for Blind Children, Pittsburgh 179 64,724.47
Blind And Vision Rehabilitation Services of Pittsburgh, Homestead 34 12,294.03
Royer-Greaves School for the Blind, Downingtown 27 9,762.91

Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico Department of Education, San Juan 633 228,885.97
Puerto Rico Department of Education, PNP, San Juan 16 5,785.43
Instituto Loaiza Cordero para Niños Ciegos, San Juan 63 22,780.12
Rehabilitation Center for the Blind of Puerto Rico, San Juan 53 19,164.23

Rhode Island

Rhode Island Department of Education, Providence 146 52,792.02
Rhode Island Department of Education, PNP, Providence 47 16,994.69

South Carolina

South Carolina Department of Education, Columbia 477 172,478.05
South Carolina School for the Deaf, Blind, and Multihandicapped, Columbia 228 82,442.34
South Carolina Commission for the Blind, Columbia 28 10,124.50
South Carolina School for the Deaf, Blind, and Multihandicapped, PNP, Columbia 44 15,909.93
South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs, Columbia 451 163,076.73

South Dakota

South Dakota Department of Education, Pierre 72 26,034.42
South Dakota School for the Blind & Visually Impaired, Aberdeen 137 49,537.72
South Dakota Rehabilitation Center for the Blind, Sioux Falls 6 2,169.54

Tennessee

Tennessee State Department of Education, Nashville 792 286,378.65
Tennessee State Department of Education, PNP, Nashville 31 11,209.27
Tennessee School for the Blind, Nashville 149 53,876.79

Texas

Texas Education Agency, Austin 4,917 1,777,934.15
Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Austin 126 45,560.24
The Lighthouse for the Blind of Houston, Houston 41 14,825.16
Criss Cole Rehabilitation Center, Austin 51 18,441.05
Texas Department of Mental Health-Mental Retardation, Austin 558 201,766.78

Utah

Utah State Office of Education, Ogden 505 182,602.55
Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind, Ogden 192 69,425.13

Vermont

Vermont State Department of Education, South Burlington 132 47,729.78

Virgin Islands

Virgin Islands Department of Education, St. Thomas 20 7,231.78

Virginia

Virginia Department of Education, Richmond 1,048 378,945.49
Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind—Staunton, Staunton 33 11,932.44
Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, Richmond 83 30,011.90
Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, PNP, Richmond 16 5,785.43

Washington

Washington State Department of Public Instruction, Vancouver 844 305,181.29
Washington State Department of Public Instruction, PNP, Vancouver 56 20,249.00
Washington State School for the Blind, Vancouver 59 21,333.76

West Virginia

West Virginia State Department of Education, Romney 245 88,589.36
West Virginia State Department of Education, PNP, Romney 2 723.18
West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and the Blind, Romney 85 30,735.08

Wisconsin

Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Janesville 748 270,468.73
Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, PNP, Janesville 20 7,231.78
Wisconsin School for the Visually Handicapped & Educational Services for the Visually Impaired, Janesville 39 14,101.98

Wyoming

Wyoming Department of Education, Riverton 88 31,819.85
Wyoming Department of Education, PNP, Riverton 53 19,164.23
Totals 58,939 21,311,706.46

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