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APH 2010 Annual Report Cover

American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.
2010 Annual Report
1839 Frankfort Avenue
Louisville, Kentucky 40206
USA
www.aph.org

2010 Annual Report
October 1, 2009 — September 30, 2010
American Printing House for the Blind, Inc.

Also available in PDF Edition

INTRODUCTION

Photo of front of APH building

SERVICE SINCE 1858

The American Printing House for the Blind (APH) has served our nation’s blind and visually impaired citizens since before the Civil War. Founded in 1858, APH is the oldest company in the U.S. dedicated to creating products for blind people and is the largest organization of its kind in the world.

EXTENSIVE RANGE OF PRODUCTS

APH’s product lines uphold our mission and include a wide variety of unique educational and daily living items. A few examples of our hundreds of products include: braille and large print textbooks and tests; talking educational software; accessible technology devices; tactile graphics tools; and science and mathematics teaching kits.

In partnership with the field of blindness, the APH Department of Research supports the creation of a wide range of products by maintaining ongoing product research and development.

APH’s product offerings are detailed in our print catalog and our accessible online shopping site, which are organized into the core curriculum and the National Agenda’s expanded core curriculum instructional areas.

Specialty products such as audio books and braille restaurant menus are created by APH for commercial customers. In addition, APH makes custom-ordered materials on demand, such as braille and large print textbooks.

UNIQUE SERVICES OFFERED

Examples of the many services offered by APH include:

MANDATE AND CORPORATE STATUS

Much of APH’s mandate is derived from the federal Act to Promote the Education of the Blind of 1879. This act designates APH as the official supplier of educational materials to all eligible blind students in the United States working at less than college level.

APH is a private, nonprofit 501(c)corporation. Responsibility for its administration rests with:

APH voluntarily complies with the provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 that sets the business standards for corporate governance and financial disclosure.

APH and its full range of products and services that support products, visit our informational website: www.aph.org or our shopping site: shop.aph.org.

MISSION STATEMENT

The American Printing House for the Blind promotes independence of blind and visually impaired persons by providing specialized materials, products, and services needed for education and life.

OFFICERS, TRUSTEES, AND COMMITTEES

Officers, Trustees, and Committees, Fiscal Year 2010

Portrait

Dr. Charles Barr
Board Chairman

CORPORATE TRUSTEES

CORPORATE OFFICERS

EX OFFICIO TRUSTEES

Ex Officio Trustees are responsible for the administration of the federal Act to Promote the Education of the Blind of 1879. The Ex Officio Trustees are the executive heads of schools for the blind, the chief state school officers of each state department of education, or the executive officers of other agencies serving the blind. If they choose, these executives may designate the Trusteeship to an appropriate professional within their organizations.

EX OFFICIO TRUSTEE ADVISORY COMMITTEES OCTOBER, 2009—OCTOBER, 2010

The name of each member is followed by his or her term expiration date.

EDUCATIONAL SERVICES ADVISORY COMMITTEE

EDUCATIONAL PRODUCTS ADVISORY COMMITTEE

FINANCIAL AND PRODUCTION HIGHLIGHTS

REVENUE DOLLAR

TYPES OF PRODUCTS SOLD

APH PRODUCTION HIGHLIGHTS

Braille Pages Produced

Pages Printed in Large Type Department

Audio Minutes Recorded

*Note: APH now outsources the majority of its printing. The number of pages produced outside of APH are not reflected in this figure.

EXECUTIVE REPORT

Portrait
Tuck Tinsley III
APH President

FISCAL YEAR 2010 EXECUTIVE REPORT

FOCUS ON PRODUCTS

The overriding focus of activities at APH in fiscal 2010 was on the development of products, as it should have been. From the identification of student needs—to ways to address those needs—to prototypes for pilot testing—to specification adjustments from the pilot—to development of models for field testing—to production specs from the field test-to production-to distribution, the focus was on products, products, products.

During the state-of-the-company address at Annual Meeting in October, we attempted to put 2010 into perspective by saying, "This is a quote from the 1996 state-of-the-company: ‘On April 25, 1996, seven months into the year, the Federal budget for 1996 was approved at the 1995 level, with APH receiving $6.68 million for the Act. Nine new products were introduced in 1996, highlighted by the introduction of the new APH Handi-Cassette II Player/Recorder.’ Back to 2010-$24.6 million was appropriated for the Act, and 108 new catalog items were brought to market in 2010!"

Yes, a record 108 new catalog items were introduced in 2010. In fairness, the 9 new products in 1996 should be compared to 33 products in 2010. APH’s accounting processes have changed in the past decade: we now count each item that is assigned a catalog number, and is therefore available for sale as a product. So, for example, a "product" in 1996 may be counted as four products/catalog items today (full kit, part A, print teacher’s manual, and braille teacher’s manual).

Examples of new products in 2010 are Building On Patterns 1st Grade; CVI Complexities Sequences; O&M Family Booklet; Book Port Plus; Test Ready; Flip-Over Concept Books; Verbal View Office Ribbon Bar; Early Braille Trade Books: Sunshine Kit 1 & 2; and What Is IT? Kit.

MAJORITY OF IDEAS COME FROM OUR FIELD

Research staff at APH include project leaders in twelve areas: braille literacy, braille instruction, low vision, assistive technology, early childhood, emergent literacy, multiple disabilities, tactile graphics, adult life, tests and assessments, cortical visual impairment, and core curriculum. While these staff members direct and coordinate product development activities, the entire field is involved in identifying student needs and ways to address those needs.

In FY 2010, 100 new product ideas submitted to APH passed the various screenings and were moved into the initial phase of product development. Only 20 of these 100 ideas came from APH advisory committees, task forces, or internal staff; thus 80% originated outside APH. We ended the fiscal year on September 30, with 307 projects in some area of product development. Most significantly, 223 professionals served as advisory committee members, task force members, field evaluators, and various roles as consultants.

PRODUCT-RELATED TRAINING AND PRESENTATIONS

During FY 2010, APH staff:

DATABASES PROVIDE VALUABLE SERVICES

APH’s databases are "products" that provide consumers and service providers with valuable services, as follows:

TEXTBOOKS – THE ESSENTIAL PRODUCTS

The Accessible Textbook Department celebrated its 10th anniversary as APH’s designated textbook department in 2010.

2010 highlights included the following:

SOCIAL MEDIA – COMMUNICATION PRODUCTS

We continued to expand APH’s social media presence. In 2010,

  1. we launched a new, updated Facebook page;
  2. we redesigned our YouTube Channel page;
  3. we have over 4,000 searchable articles posted to our "Fred’s Head from APH" blog;
  4. we redesigned our Twitter page for over 1,200 Twitter followers who receive short messages from APH each business day; and
  5. we created an APH page on Flickr, the photo sharing site.

RECORD SALES IN FY 2010

Again, for perspective, in last year’s state-of-the-company address, we stated, "For FY 2009, sales were $24 million, a 4.5% increase over 2008, and the highest total ever for APH." Well, we closed the books on FY 2010 on Sept. 30, 2010. Sales were $29,006,000 — up $5.9 million, 24% from our historic high in 2009!

DATA FROM THE FY 2010 FEDERAL QUOTA CENSUS

Data for 2010 regarding the Act to Promote the Education of the Blind indicate the number of eligible students registered was 59,341, a decrease of 14 from the number registered for FY 2009. The 2010 appropriation provided $320.18 per student for educational materials, a 5% increase over the $304.93 per capita allocation in 2009. Of the 59,341 students, 9% (5,411) were registered as braille readers, 27% (16,075) as visual readers, 8% (4,561) as auditory readers, 34% (20,268) as non-readers, and 22% (13,026) as pre-readers. Of this group, 83% (49,398) were registered by state departments of education, 9% (5,257) were registered by residential schools for the blind, 5% (3,065) were registered by rehabilitation programs, and 3% (1,621) were registered by programs for the multiply disabled.

CLOSING

APH’s 152nd year of service to the blind and visually impaired population of our country is in the books. It was a very good year, indeed. On behalf of the APH Board and administration, we close with a salute to the dedicated professionals in the field who assist us daily in the administration of the Act to Promote the Education of the Blind.

Respectfully submitted,
Charles Barr, M.D., Chairman
Tuck Tinsley III, Ed.D, President


SECRETARY’S REPORT

2010 FORMAL MEETING OF EX OFFICIO TRUSTEES

The 142nd Formal Meeting of the Ex Officio Trustees of the American Printing House for the Blind (APH) convened at 12:40 p.m., October 16, 2010, at the Galt House Hotel in Louisville, Kentucky. The following conferees were present:

EX OFFICIO TRUSTEES

SPECIAL GUESTS

APH STAFF

MINUTES OF FORMAL MEETING

The meeting was opened with a welcome from Dr. Tuck Tinsley III, APH President and member of its Board of Trustees. Ex Officio Trustees, special guests, and APH staff in attendance introduced themselves and the organizations and departments they represented.

FOCUS ON USE OF APH’S REGISTRATION DATA

Dr. Tinsley requested that the major portion of the meeting focus on a plan to address inappropriate use of APH’s Federal Quota census registration data, rather than the provision of an overview of FY 2010 activities. Attendees approved the change in the meeting’s agenda.

In laying out concerns related to use of registration data, Dr. Tinsley provided the following information:

Dr. Tinsley asked Jim Durst, Superintendent of the Indiana School for the Blind; Steven Rothstein, President of the Perkins School for the Blind; and Carl Augusto, President of the American Foundation for the Blind, to facilitate discussion of these concerns and of a plan to address them.

A very enthusiastic discussion resulted in agreement that research needs to be conducted as soon as possible to provide accurate data about the literacy level of students with visual impairments. Steven Rothstein agreed to chair a committee to develop a conceptual framework. Those agreeing to join him on the committee were Jim Durst, Carl Augusto, Cay Holbrook, Sandy Lewis, and Jane Erin.

APPROVAL OF ADVISORY COMMITTEE REPORTS

Frank Simpson, Chairman of the Education Products Advisory Committee (EPAC) and Ex Officio Trustee representing the Lavelle School for the Blind, and Nancy Niebrugge, Chairman of the Education Services Advisory Committee (ESAC) and Ex Officio Trustee representing the Braille Institute of America, recognized the members of each of their committees and requested approval of the committees’ reports previously distributed to the Ex Officio Trustees. A motion to accept the reports as offered was made, seconded, and passed unanimously.

APPROVAL OF COMMITTEE NOMINEES

Michael Bina, Chairman of the Nominations Committee and Ex Officio Trustee representing the Maryland School for the Blind, presented the committee’s slate of nominees for advisory committee members and chairpersons for 2011, as follows:

A motion to accept the nominations as presented was made, seconded, and unanimously passed.

RECOGNITION OF RETIRING ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Bob Brasher and Janie Blome recognized Nancy Niebrugge and Frank Simpson as retiring chairmen of the Advisory Committees. Also recognized were the alternate members, Steven Rothstein and Angyln Young.

Dr. Tinsley made closing remarks and adjourned the 2010 Formal Meeting of the Ex Officio Trustees of APH at 1:45 p.m.

Respectfully submitted,
Bill Beavin
Secretary

Note: Full reports of the Ex Officio Trustee Advisory Committees are provided in this annual report.

HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE 2010 APH ANNUAL MEETING

Photo of a manJim Gibbons, President and CEO, Goodwill Industries International, presented the opening keynote address "Crossroads to Opportunity," for the 142nd Annual Meeting.



Photo of three menChristopher Migel (left) and Carl Augusto, AFB, (right) presented Tuck Tinsley with the American Foundation for the Blind Migel Medal, the highest honor in the field of blindness.



Photo of a boyTime for Tea by Michael Delehanty Jr. from Whitehall Elementary School Whitehall, PA won Honorable Mention for Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Grades in the APH InSights Art Competition.



Photo of two womenEach general session of the Annual Meeting was facilitated by Trustees. Linda Lyle (NM) and Sally Giittinger (NE) show off their “Girl Power” as they facilitate the first general session.



Photo of a man and womanESAC Chair Frank Simpson (NY) joined EPAC Chair Nancy Niebrugge (CA) to share highlights of the Advisory Committee reports.



Photo of two womenSilvana Sung and Judith Lesner accepted the Creative Use of Braille award on behalf of the Lucky Touch Fortune Cookie, a student business venture of the California School for the Blind.



Photo of two womenDrs. Rebecca Burnett and LaRhea Sanford (TN) were the recipients of the Virgil Zickel award for the Functional Vision/Learning Media Assessment.



Photo of a large groupSix direct service providers attended Annual Meeting for the first time after being chosen as APH Scholars. Scholars and their nominating Trustees are (l-r): Sally Giittinger and Scholar Mary Farris (NE), Karen Duffy and Scholar LeAnna McDonald (NE), Stephanie Bissonette and Scholar Liese Reagan (VT), Scholar Kay Workman (MO), Cheryl Misialek and Scholar Cindy Williams (ND), and Scholar Cath Tendler-Valencia (CA).



Photo of a manDr. James Kutsch accepted the Hall of Fame plaque for inductee Morris Frank.



Photo of a large groupFun and great information are on the menu at Tuck’s Diner Information Fair. Pictured is the Accessible Textbooks staff!



Photo of a womanMary Nelle McLennan, APH, was surprised by her many friends and family with a special engraved Wall of Tribute stone that appears in, and supports, the Hall of Fame.



Photo of two menCarl Augusto and Christopher Migel accepted the Hall of Fame plaque for inductee M.C. Migel.



Photo of large groupSixteen new Ex Officio Trustees attended an Orientation Breakfast during Annual Meeting. Front row (l-r): Melanie Hennessy (IL), Lee Speer (SC), Dorothe Mumford (DE), Norma Villanueva (District of Columbia), Marie Piquion-Leach (NC), Cheryl Manuel (KS), Kristen Oien (MN), and Mathis Calvin (NY). Back row (l-r): Bob Disher (OR), Nancy Armstrong (VA), Brent Pitt (TX), Cynthia “Pepper” Watson (OK), Hollie Murdock (UT), Samuel Ace (AZ), Bobby Simpson (LA), Gary Cusick (KY)



Photo of three peopleJanie Blome, APH, Marty McKenzie (SC), and Bob Brasher presented the closing session.



Photo of three womenCay Holbrook (BC) explains the uses of Building on Patterns during a product training session.




REPORTS FROM THE ADVISORY COMMITTEES

Reports from the Advisory Committees to the Ex Officio Trustees
of the American Printing House for the Blind for Fiscal Year 2010

FORMAL REPORT: 2010 NOMINATIONS COMMITTEE FOR EX OFFICIO TRUSTEE ADVISORY COMMITTEES

The members of the 2010 Nominations Committee are:

Members of the Committee are honored to have been asked to perform the important assignment of nominating Ex Officio Trustees to serve on APH’s two Advisory Committees.

The Educational Products Advisory Committee and the Educational Services Advisory Committee support APH in the organization’s continuous improvement process, focusing on providing quality products and services that effectively meet the needs of our field. Ex Officio Trustees benefit and contribute through service on the Advisory Committees; the experience is an opportunity to learn about APH and to impact our important work.

Advisory Committee members are nominated with the following in mind:

The 2010 Nominations Committee recommended the following slate that was unanimously approved at the Formal Meeting of the Ex Officio Trustees convened on October 16, 2010 in Louisville, Kentucky:

EDUCATIONAL PRODUCTS ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Chair for a one-year term: Stacy Grandt, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Wisconsin Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired

For three-year terms as committee members: Gerald Kitzhoffer, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Overbrook School for the Blind (PA); Paula Mauro, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Center for Instructional Supports and Accessible Materials (OH)

Alternate for a one-year term: Suzanne Dalton, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Florida State Department of Education

The full 2010-2011 Educational Products Advisory Committee will be: (The year preceding the name indicates the final year of regular committee tenure.)

THE EDUCATIONAL SERVICES ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Chair for a one-year term:
Marjorie Kaiser
, Ex Officio Trustee representing the South Dakota School for the Blind

For two-year terms as committee members: Patrick Clancy, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Iowa Department of Education; James Olson, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Colorado Department of Education

Alternate for a one-year term: Barbara McCarthy, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired

The full 2010-2011 Educational Services Advisory Committee will be: (The year preceding the name indicates the final year of regular committee tenure.)

The Nominations Committee thanks the new and returning Advisory Committee members and chairs for their willingness to serve. We encourage all interested Ex Officio Trustees to declare your interest to be a future Advisory Committee member; it is the single most important way to contribute as an Ex Officio Trustee.

Respectfully submitted,
Michael Bina, Chair
James Downs and Angyln Young, Members of the Nominations Committee
Louisville, Kentucky
October 16, 2010

REPORT OF THE EDUCATIONAL SERVICES ADVISORY COMMITTEE TO THE TRUSTEES OF THE AMERICAN PRINTING HOUSE FOR THE BLIND FOR FISCAL YEAR 2010

PURPOSE OF ESAC

The purpose of the Educational Services Advisory Committee (ESAC) is to:

INTRODUCTION TO ESAC REPORT

In May of 2010 the Educational Services Advisory Committee (ESAC) met in Louisville, Kentucky at the American Printing House for the Blind (APH). The ESAC committee met to address the 2009 ESAC report and to develop commendations and recommendations. To assist with this endeavor, interactive presentations were made by APH’s administrative staff and ESAC committee members. These interactive presentations provided progress updates on the 2009 recommendations, operations and information on new initiatives.

ESAC COMMENDATIONS 2010

Consistent with the Act to Promote the Education of the Blind (1879), the committee commends APH for:

  1. Redesigning the APH home page, which will improve navigability, as well as provide new features, content, and visual appeal.
  2. Combining multiple APH catalogs into a main products catalog and a daily living skills catalog.
  3. Developing and distributing an effective Leaders to Leaders packet to help Ex Officio Trustees promote APH.
  4. Advancing national awareness of APH products through activities such as the "Teaching Tools for Students Who Are Blind and Visually Impaired" report to Congress on June 16, 2010, in Washington DC.
  5. Increasing the visibility of APH products by exhibiting at conferences and providing training, and creating the infrastructure at APH that facilitates this process.
  6. Hiring staff members who have specific technical expertise to address current and projected needs.
  7. Upgrading the Student Registration System (SRS) by adding functions such as primary instructional language and individual log-on.
  8. Increasing the capacity to provide information to the field by developing a plan for studio space and equipment to enhance distance learning opportunities.
  9. Acquiring the M.C. Migel Library and making significant progress within one year toward providing access to the collection.

ESAC RECOMMENDATIONS 2010

Consistent with the Act to Promote the Education of the Blind (1879), the committee recommends that APH:

  1. Continue to develop training materials such as web-based tutorials, guides, and distance learning to maximize the use of APH products.
  2. Consider using additional methods of data collection related to products that will provide APH with information regarding use and effectiveness.
  3. Use the expertise of the EOTs to support the APH mission by:
    • sharing student success stories as they relate to APH products
    • helping with APH exhibits
    • promoting APH products and services through social media networks
    • expanding the "train-the-trainer" model
    • continuing to promote the Leaders to Leaders program.
  4. Establish criteria and priorities for participation by APH staff in conference exhibits.
  5. Develop a plan for cost effective dissemination of product information through a catalog format based on input from stakeholders.
  6. Continue with the redesign of the APH home page, and include links to other resources in the field in order to increase visibility and Google ranking.
  7. Collaborate with EOTs to identify additional agencies that serve eligible adult students who might benefit from APH products.
  8. Establish an APH/EOT task force to explore ways to increase deposits of files in Louis.
  9. Develop an evaluation tool that will help guide the selection of the APH Scholars.

Respectfully submitted,
Frank Simpson, Chair
Educational Services Advisory Committee

REPORT OF THE EDUCATIONAL PRODUCTS ADVISORY COMMITTEE TO THE TRUSTEES OF THE AMERICAN PRINTING HOUSE FOR THE BLIND FOR FISCAL YEAR 2010

PURPOSE OF EPAC

The purpose of the Educational Products Advisory Committee (EPAC) is:

INTRODUCTION TO EPAC REPORT

In April of 2010, the Educational Products Advisory Committee (EPAC) met for the ninth year as a formal advisory body to the American Printing House for the Blind (APH). Committee members appreciated hearing the thoughtful responses and progress made on the recommendations from the previous year. The committee also appreciated the opportunity to take an in-depth tour of the production floor and modeling workshop. Information from the project leaders and staff was candid and thorough. It was exciting to hear about their individual dreams and aspirations for their work. The passion and commitment of the staff and administration was contagious. At every level, it is clear that this staff is supportive of one another. The EPAC would like to thank APH staff and administration for their hospitality, delicious meals, and attention to every detail. You make our work easy!

EPAC COMMENDATIONS 2010

The EPAC commends the American Printing House for the Blind for:

  1. Initiative shown by staff members who have undertaken a process of planning strategically, thereby setting and achieving aggressive deadlines, priorities, and goals. The end result of such planning is evidenced by a balanced, prioritized workload and the timely release of new products.
  2. Embedding data collection analysis, research, promising practices, and national standards throughout the development process. Examples include Tactile Town (data collection analysis and research) and MathBuilders (alignment to national standards). Additionally, the committee strongly commends APH for obtaining end-user feedback by sponsoring events such as the Tactile Graphics Readers Speak Out.
  3. Developing integrated products that demonstrate cross-departmental collaboration, such as the Early Braille Trade Books and Building on Patterns. The resulting products and website provide direct service providers exceptional tools for tracking braille contractions and selecting additional reading materials that are developmentally appropriate.
  4. Initiating research on the effectiveness of student use of electronic files in conjunction with large print or braille textbooks.
  5. Considering the needs of non-English speaking students in the future development of APH products and incorporating the native language question on the census form.
  6. Upgrading and expanding the Tactile Graphic Image Library by adding dedicated personnel, improving user instructions, incorporating a user forum, simplifying subject categories, and adding the ability to upload external and batched files.
  7. Their spirit of collaboration and their belief in possibilities. The excellent products of Book Port Plus and Braille+ Mobile Manager are evidence of the synergistic value of collaborating with external partners.

EPAC RECOMMENDATIONS 2010

The EPAC 2010 has elected to limit the number of recommendations in order to emphasize the critical need to address the following list of priorities.

The EPAC recommends that the American Printing House for the Blind:

  1. Responds to the concerns of the field of educators of students who are blind or have a visual impairment, who are frustrated with the delays in the development and production of Building on Patterns. The committee recognizes the progress APH has made on the development of the core components of Building on Patterns, resulting in expanding it from a tool to teach braille code into a fully integrated literacy program. However, since 2006 this committee has made strong recommendations with detailed timelines for completion. It is this committee’s expectation that all resources necessary be allocated at this time to the completion of Building on Patterns. As work on the units of grade two draws to a close it is further recommended that a transition plan be developed to address the ongoing need for enhancement of Building on Patterns and other literacy products.
  2. Increase emphasis on the product development for children and adults with multiple disabilities by:

    • Infusing the needs of this population into both new and existing products as appropriate and clearly identifying those product features in the catalog;
    • Allocating dedicated resources to meet the specific needs of this growing population;
    • Obtaining feedback from multi-disciplinary team members, in addition to professionals within the field of the education of persons with visual impairments, for field testing of products that have specific usefulness within this population.
  3. Increase braille production capacity to eliminate backlogs of textbook embossing. EPAC recognizes that APH has successfully committed resources to reduce the backlog in braille transcription as was previously recommended. A concomitant increase in production is now needed.
  4. Continue to emphasize product development pertinent to the Expanded Core Curriculum, with priority placed on Nemeth Braille and orientation and mobility products, and e-text files to accompany braille and large print textbooks.

Respectfully submitted,
Nancy Niebrugge, Chair
Educational Products Advisory Committee

ADDENDUM TO THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE REPORTS, PROVIDED BY APH:

APH Products Approved for Purchase with Federal Quota Funds, FY 2010

DISTRIBUTION OF ELIGIBLE STUDENTS

Based on the Federal Quota Census of January 5, 2009 (FY2010)

Tables showing the distribution (link opens a new window)

AGENCIES RECEIVING FEDERAL QUOTA FUNDS

Agencies for the Education of the Visually Impaired in the United States Receiving Federal Quota Funds Due Under an Act to Promote the Education of the Blind, Fiscal Year 2010

Note: The agencies listed in this section are in the following order within each state: State Departments of Education, Schools for the Blind, Rehabilitation Programs, Programs for Students with Multiple Disabilities.

*Note: The abbreviation "PNP" means "Private, Non-profit."

State and Agency Pupils as of January 5, 2009 FY 2010 Allocation in Dollars
Alabama
Alabama State Department of Education, Talladega 894 313,638.63
Alabama State Department of Education, *PNP, Talladega 78 27,510.54
Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind, Talladega 321 115,431.32
Alaska
Alaska State Department of Education, Anchorage 158 56,440.25
American Samoa
American Samoa Department of Education, Pago Pago 13 4,553.75
Arizona
Arizona State Department of Education, Phoenix 696 240,469.70
Arizona State Department of Education, PNP, Phoenix 236 86,491.43
Arizona State Schools for the Deaf and the Blind, Tucson 271 95,290.42
Arkansas
Arkansas State Department of Education, Sherwood 297 106,042.93
Arkansas State Department of Education, PNP, Sherwood 49 17,357.11
Arkansas School for the Blind, Little Rock 110 39,381.12
Lions World Services for the Blind, Little Rock 40 14,373.91
Conway Human Development Center, Conway 76 27,345.52
California
California Department of Education, Sacramento 5132 1,811,975.10
California Department of Education, PNP, Sacramento 833 302,766.12
California School for the Blind, Fremont 72 25,296.59
Braille Institute of America Inc, Los Angeles 68 23,847.47
Orientation Center for the Blind, Fremont 14 4,999.86
Colorado
Colorado Department of Education, Colorado Springs 616 216,249.27
Colorado Department of Education, PNP, Colorado Springs 145 53,922.54
Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind, Colorado Springs 69 24,128.46
Rehabilitation Center, Denver 19 6,985.04
Connecticut
Board of Education & Services for the Blind, Windsor 656 234,688.16
Board of Education & Services for the Blind, PNP, Windsor 5 1,828.37
Oak Hill School, Hartford 20 7,194.59
Connecticut State Department of Developmental Services, Hartford 82 29,954.24
Delaware
State Department of Education, PNP, New Castle 21 7,497.10
Division for the Visually Impaired, New Castle 166 59,547.18
District of Columbia
District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington 106 38,823.50
District of Columbia Department of Human Services, Washington 8 2,931.60
Florida
Florida State Department of Education, Tampa 1805 646,935.20
Florida State Department of Education, PNP, Tampa 81 28,932.62
Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind, St. Augustine 196 68,542.84
Division of Blind Services, Daytona Beach 47 16,104.09
Miami Lighthouse for the Blind, Inc., Miami 36 13,195.29
Conklin Centers for the Blind, Daytona Beach 34 12,138.34
Georgia
Georgia State Department of Education, Clarkston 1135 402,727.13
Georgia State Department of Education, PNP, Clarkston 11 4,029.17
Georgia Academy for the Blind, Macon 99 34,825.64
Center for the Visually Impaired, Atlanta 68 24,812.33
East Central Regional Hospital, Gracewood 4 1,456.49
Guam
Guam Department of Education, Hagatña 25 9,160.47
Hawaii
Hawaii Department of Education, Honolulu 177 62,213.60
Hawaii Department of Education, PNP, Honolulu 25 8,460.01
Hawaii Center for the Deaf and the Blind, Honolulu 3 1,009.22
Idaho
Idaho State Department of Education, Gooding 250 89,129.09
Idaho State Department of Education, PNP, Gooding 3 1,059.57
Idaho School for the Deaf and the Blind, Gooding 23 8,344.12
Idaho Commission for the Blind, Boise 17 6,155.87
Idaho State School and Hospital 4 1,385.94
Illinois
Illinois State Board of Education, Chicago 1825 641,440.47
Illinois State Board of Education, PNP, Chicago 552 191,070.08
Illinois School for the Visually Impaired, Jacksonville 108 39,436.72
The Hadley School for the Blind, Winnetka 1000 360,459.93
The Chicago Lighthouse for People who are Blind or Visually Impaired, Chicago 287 103,566.44
Illinois Center for Rehabilitation and Education—Wood, Chicago 30 10,776.17
The Hope School, Springfield 13 4,541.21
Indiana
Indiana Department of Education, Indianapolis 708 253,485.09
Indiana Department of Education, PNP, Indianapolis 11 4,041.03
Indiana School for the Blind, Indianapolis 111 40,533.96
Indiana Department of Education—Adult Students, Indianapolis 78 27,760.76
Iowa
Iowa Department of Education, Vinton 448 161,506.65
Iowa Department of Education, PNP, Vinton 4 1,468.90
Iowa Braille and Sight Saving School, Vinton 10 3,540.96
Iowa Department for the Blind, Glenwood 9 2,957.40
Glenwood Resource Center, Glenwood 34 12,276.35
Kansas
Kansas State Board of Education, Kansas City 477 169,413.77
Kansas State Board of Education, PNP, Kansas City 140 50,540.10
Kansas State School for the Blind, Kansas City 43 15,336.22
Services for the Blind, Topeka 3 1,066.72
Kentucky
Kentucky Department of Education, Louisville 542 191,191.29
Kentucky Department of Education, PNP, Louisville 45 16,355.08
Kentucky School for the Blind, Louisville 54 19,292.01
Kentucky Department for the Blind, Louisville 26 8,822.74
Louisiana
Louisiana Department of Education, Baton Rouge 318 112,080.64
Louisiana Department of Education, PNP, Baton Rouge 3 1,090.82
Louisiana School for the Visually Impaired 74 27,004.84
Louisiana Center for the Blind, Ruston 108 38,923.98
The Lighthouse for the Blind in New Orleans Inc., New Orleans 3 1,109.43
Maine
Maine Division for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Bangor 163 56,092.09
Maine Division for the Blind and Visually Impaired, PNP, Bangor 17 6,303.34
Maryland
Maryland State Department of Education, Baltimore 740 260,976.76
Maryland State Department of Education, PNP, Baltimore 129 44,377.64
The Maryland School for the Blind, Baltimore 154 55,311.36
Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind, Riverdale 97 34,394.31
Massachusetts
Massachusetts Department of Education, Malden 1296 459,352.68
Massachusetts Department of Education, PNP, Malden 67 23,595.08
Perkins School for the Blind—Infants and Toddlers, Watertown 345 123,201.06
The Carroll Center for the Blind, Newton 24 8,551.34
Massachusetts Association for the Blind, Brookline 16 5,850.78
Walter E. Fernald State School, Waltham 41 14,839.77
Massachusetts Commission for the Blind, Boston 461 166,924.05
Perkins School for the Blind—School Programs, Watertown 157 56,786.35
Michigan
Michigan Department of Education, Flint 1961 699,954.26
Michigan Department of Education, PNP, Flint 10 3,551.24
Visually Handicapped Services/Detroit Receiving Hospital and University Health Center, Detroit 13 4,732.26
Michigan Commission for the Blind Training Center, Kalamazoo 220 77,601.24
Minnesota
Minnesota Department of Education, Roseville 772 276,286.89
Minnesota Department of Education, PNP, Roseville 10 3,662.95
Minnesota State Academy for the Blind, Faribault 48 17,367.15
Blind, Inc., Minneapolis 14 5,138.05
Vision Loss Resources, Minneapolis 21 7,685.30
Mississippi
Mississippi State Department of Education, Jackson 197 69,106.69
Mississippi School for the Blind, Jackson 73 25,670.34
Addie McBryde Rehabilitation Center for the Blind, Jackson 16 5,756.49
Missouri
Department of Elementary & Secondary Education, St. Louis 932 329,679.26
Department of Elementary & Secondary Education, PNP, St. Louis 194 69,041.96
Missouri School for the Blind, St. Louis 67 23,914.77
Alphapointe Association for the Blind, Kansas City 31 11,342.10
Missouri Family Support Division 27 9,085.99
Montana
Montana State Department of Public Instruction, Great Falls 187 66,125.63
Montana State Department of Public Instruction, PNP, Great Falls 8 2,821.39
Montana School for the Deaf and the Blind, Great Falls 15 5,249.08
Nebraska
Nebraska State Department of Education, Nebraska City 399 140,538.98
Nebraska State Department of Education, PNP, Nebraska City 3 1,097.02
Nebraska Center for the Education of Children Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired, Nebraska City 14 4,953.30
Nevada
Nevada Department of Education, Carson City 338 121,509.50
New Hampshire
New Hampshire Department of Education, Concord 136 49,961.43
New Hampshire Department of Education, PNP, Concord 18 6,693.83
New Jersey
New Jersey Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Newark 1547 543,988.53
St. Joseph’s School for the Blind/Concordia Learning Center, Jersey City 129 46,466.84
New Mexico
New Mexico State Department of Education, Alamogordo 538 189,293.01
New Mexico State Department of Education, PNP, Alamogordo 13 4,520.18
New Mexico School for the Visually Handicapped, Alamogordo 88 30,517.38
New York
New York State Education Department, Batavia 2762 981,146.73
New York State Education Department, PNP, Batavia 1159 418,201.78
Lavelle School for the Blind, Bronx 111 40,376.45
The New York Institute for Special Education, Bronx 112 39,515.21
New York State School for the Blind, Batavia 57 20,416.48
Helen Keller National Center 30 10,951.80
North Carolina
North Carolina Department of Public Education, Raleigh 1096 386,336.80
North Carolina Department of Public Education, PNP, Raleigh 401 145,870.58
The Governor Morehead School, Raleigh 336 118,194.23
Division of Services for the Blind, Raleigh 23 8,429.12
North Dakota
Department of Public Instruction, Grand Forks 165 59,424.57
Department of Public Instruction, PNP, Grand Forks 13 4,753.76
North Dakota School for the Blind, Grand Forks 71 25,633.11
Northern Mariana Islands
Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands (CNMI) Department of Education 15 5,472.70
Ohio
Ohio State Department of Education, Columbus 1474 516,194.49
Ohio State Department of Education, PNP, Columbus 16 5,522.99
Ohio State School for the Blind, Columbus 90 31,764.31
Oklahoma
Oklahoma Department of Education, Oklahoma City 522 179,154.80
Oklahoma School for the Blind, Muskogee 81 29,332.70
Oregon
Oregon Department of Education, Salem 622 220,130.56
Oregon Department of Education, PNP, Salem 32 11,751.21
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg 1660 587,537.92
Pennsylvania Department of Education, PNP, Harrisburg 21 7,437.80
Overbrook School for the Blind, Philadelphia 402 146,301.69
Western Pennsylvania School for Blind Children, Pittsburgh 177 62,635.41
Blind And Vision Rehabilitation Services of Pittsburgh, Homestead 33 11,681.89
Royer-Greaves School for the Blind, Downingtown 28 10,199.83
Puerto Rico
Puerto Rico Department of Education, San Juan 693 246,972.90
Puerto Rico Department of Education, PNP, San Juan 11 4,010.00
Instituto Loaiza Cordero para Niños Ciegos, San Juan 73 25,481.61
Rehabilitation Center for the Blind of Puerto Rico, San Juan 27 9,835.96
Rhode Island
Rhode Island Department of Education, Providence 122 43,559.65
Rhode Island Department of Education, PNP, Providence 47 16,608.49
South Carolina
South Carolina Department of Education, Columbia 472 169,105.43
South Carolina School for the Deaf, Blind, and Multihandicapped, Columbia 229 78,731.89
South Carolina Commission for the Blind, Columbia 15 5,327.35
South Carolina School for the Deaf, Blind, and Multihandicapped, PNP, Columbia 58 21,008.20
South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs, Columbia 491 174,507.13
South Dakota
South Dakota Department of Education, Pierre 76 27,528.55
South Dakota School for the Blind & Visually Impaired, Aberdeen 142 51,077.79
South Dakota Rehabilitation Center for the Blind, Sioux Falls 4 1,405.22
Tennessee
Tennessee State Department of Education, Nashville 817 287,768.25
Tennessee State Department of Education, PNP, Nashville 42 15,364.51
Tennessee School for the Blind, Nashville 147 50,400.36
Texas
Texas Education Agency, Austin 4840 1,732,918.89
Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Austin 127 46,055.65
The Lighthouse for the Blind of Houston, Houston 51 18,420.39
Criss Cole Rehabilitation Center, Austin 47 15,606.24
Texas Department of Mental Health-Mental Retardation, Austin 706 250,395.72
Utah
Utah State Office of Education, Ogden 486 172,170.24
Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind, Ogden 220 80,342.83
Vermont
Vermont State Department of Education, South Burlington 139 50,202.17
Virgin Islands
Virgin Islands Department of Education, St. Thomas 22 7,535.27
Virginia
Virginia Department of Education, Richmond 1053 376,095.35
Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind—Staunton, Staunton 44 15,830.78
Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, Richmond 72 25,491.82
Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, PNP, Richmond 17 5,958.31
Washington
Washington State Department of Public Instruction, Vancouver 944 337,398.88
Washington State Department of Public Instruction, PNP, Vancouver 87 31,941.05
Washington State School for the Blind, Vancouver 59 21,293.43
West Virginia
West Virginia State Department of Education, Romney 250 88,273.63
West Virginia State Department of Education, PNP, Romney 2 725.14
West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and the Blind, Romney 78 28,331.71
Wisconsin
Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Janesville 769 274,962.55
Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, PNP, Janesville 22 7,702.98
Wisconsin School for the Visually Handicapped & Educational Services for the Visually Impaired, Janesville 47 17,199.40
Wyoming
Wyoming Department of Education, Riverton 96 34,548.55
Wyoming Department of Education, PNP, Riverton 64 23,100.53
Totals 59,341 21,091,101.98

DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENT

Department of Development and Magazine Services

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There are a variety of ways to plan for your family and loved ones with a will or living trust. View presentations on wills and estate planning considerations by visiting our website at www.aph.org. If you wish to make American Printing House for the Blind the recipient of a personal bequest, please use our full name, "American Printing House for the Blind, Inc."

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