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Annual Report 2012: Administration of the Federal Appropriation

October 1, 2011 – September 30, 2012


Secretary’s Report

2012 Formal Meeting of Ex Officio Trustees

The 144th Formal Meeting of the Ex Officio Trustees of the American Printing House the Blind (APH) convened at 12:40 p.m., October 14, 2012, at the Galt House Hotel in Louisville, Kentucky. The following conferees were present:

Ex Officio Trustee Attendees

Special Guests (Invited by Dr. Tuck Tinsley)

APH Staff Attendees

Minutes of the Business Meeting

The meeting was opened with a welcome from Dr. Tuck Tinsley III, President and member of APH’s Board of Trustees. Ex Officio Trustees in attendance introduced themselves, and indicated the programs they represented and how long they had served as Ex Officio Trustees. APH staff members also introduced themselves. Dr. Tinsley then recognized Annette Reichman with the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services in Washington, DC.

Comments Regarding FY2012

Dr. Tinsley provided a brief overview of the year, including the following:

Approval of the Committee Reports

Jonn Paris-Salb, Chair of the Education Services Advisory Committee (ESAC) and Ex Officio Trustee representing the California Department of Education, and Yvonne Ali, a member of the Education Products Advisory Committee (EPAC), and Ex Officio Trustee representing the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, recognized each of their committee members and requested approval of the committees’ reports previously distributed to the Ex Officio Trustees. A motion to accept the reports as offered was made, seconded, and passed unanimously.

Approval of the Nominations Committee

Marjorie Kaiser, Chair of the Nominations Committee and Ex Officio Trustee representing the South Dakota School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, presented the committee’s slate of nominees for advisory committee members and chairpersons as follows:

A motion to accept the Nominations Committee’s recommendations was made, seconded, and unanimously passed.

Recognition of Retiring Advisory Committee Members

Bob Brasher and Janie Blome recognized the retiring Chairs of the Advisory Committees, Jonn Paris-Salb, Ex Officio Trustee representing California Department of Education, Chairman of ESAC in 2012; and Marty McKenzie, Ex Officio Trustee representing the South Carolina School for the Deaf, Blind, and Multihandicapped, Chairman of EPAC in 2012. Also recognized was retiring EPAC member, Todd Reeves, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Western Pennsylvania School for Blind Children. Brasher and Blome then recognized the alternate members of both Advisory Committees, Yvonne Ali, Ex Officio Trustee representing Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, alternate member for EPAC in 2012; and Sally Giittinger, Ex Officio Trustee representing Nebraska Center for the Education of Children Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired, alternate member for ESAC in 2012.

Dr. Tinsley provided the closing remarks. He saluted APH’s staff for the great work they do every day and extended appreciation and admiration of the Board and management of APH for the Ex Officio Trustees for the role they play in the administration of the Act to Promote the Education of the Blind.

The 2012 Formal Meeting of the Ex Officio Trustees of APH was adjourned at 1:30 p.m.

Respectfully submitted,

Bill Beavin
Secretary

Note: Full reports of the Ex Officio Trustee Advisory Committees are provided in this annual report.

Memories from the 2012 APH Annual Meeting “Traveling the Extra Mile”

Extra Mile award BOP group photo

APH Director of Research Ralph Bartley and APH Braille Project Leader Eleanor Pester awarded “Extra Mile” awards to the many writers who assisted in the historic completion of the Building on Patterns braille reading series.

Memories from the 144th Annual Meeting of Ex Officio Trustees and Special Guests

About the APH Annual Meeting of Ex Officio Trustees

Held in Louisville each fall, Annual Meeting provides opportunities for Ex Officio Trustees to meet with APH staff, learn about new products, share input on upcoming products, help guide the direction of the APH (by participating on an Advisory Committee), and to meet other Trustees from across the U.S. APH also encourages and appreciates the participation by our many “Special Guests” who include teachers, parents, consumers, university program personnel, and other important groups of service providers.

Annual Meeting Is Mandated by the Act

In 1879, the U.S. Congress passed the Act to Promote the Education of the Blind. This act created the Federal Quota system to provide educational materials for blind students and named the American Printing House for the Blind as the national source of these materials. Part of that system requires that the Federal Quota program administrators—the Ex Officio Trustees—meet each year.

The advice and counsel of Trustees is crucial to help APH meet the needs of blind students. Participation in the meeting is one of the main responsibilities of an Ex Officio Trustee.

Reports of the Advisory Committees

Reports of the Advisory Committees to the Ex Officio Trustees of the American Printing House for the Blind for Fiscal Year 2012.

Photo of Nominations Committee

The Ex Officio Trustee Nominations Committee 2012 (left to right): Marjorie Kaiser (SD), Chair; Marty McKenzie (SC) and Sally Giittinger (NE).

Formal Report: 2012 Nominations Committee for Ex Officio Trustee Advisory Committees

The members of the 2012 Nominations Committee are:

Members of the Committee are honored to have been asked to perform the important assignment of nominating Ex Officio Trustees to serve on APH’s two Advisory Committees.

The Educational Products Advisory Committee and the Educational Services Advisory Committee support APH in the organization’s continuous improvement process, focusing on providing quality products and services that effectively meet the needs of our field. Ex Officio Trustees benefit and contribute through service on the Advisory Committees; the experience is an opportunity to learn about APH and to impact its important work.

Advisory Committee members are nominated with the following in mind:

The 2012 Nominations Committee recommended the following slate that was unanimously approved at the Formal Meeting of the Ex Officio Trustees convened on October 13, 2012 in Louisville, Kentucky:

Educational Products Advisory Committee

Chair for a one-year term:

Linda Lyle, Ex Officio Trustee representing the New Mexico School for the Visually Handicapped and the New Mexico State Department of Education

For three-year terms as committee members:

Dorinda Rife, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Perkins School for the Blind—School Programs, Massachusetts
Madeleine Burkindine, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Kansas School for the Blind

Alternate for a one-year term:

Yvonne Ali, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education

The full 2012-2013 Educational Products Advisory Committee will be: (The year preceding the name indicates the final year of regular committee tenure.)

The Educational Services Advisory Committee

Chair for a one-year term:

Jim Olson, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind and the Colorado Department of Education

For two-year terms as committee members:

Jim Durst, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Indiana School for the Blind
Christine Hinton, Ex Officio Trustee representing the New Jersey Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired

Alternate for a one-year term:

Sally Giittinger, Ex Officio Trustee representing the Nebraska Center for the Education of Children Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired

The full 2012-2013 Educational Services Advisory Committee will be: (The year preceding the name indicates the final year of regular committee tenure.)

The Nominations Committee thanks the new and returning Advisory Committee members and chairs for their willingness to serve. We encourage all interested Ex Officio Trustees to declare your interest to be a future Advisory Committee member; it is the single most important way to contribute as an Ex Officio Trustee.

Respectfully submitted,

Marjorie Kaiser portrait
Marjorie Kaiser, Chair
Sally Giitinger and Marty McKenzie, Members of the Nominations Committee
Louisville, Kentucky
October 13, 2012

Report of the Educational Services Advisory Committee

Report of the Educational Services Advisory Committee to the Trustees of the American Printing House for the Blind for Fiscal Year 2012.

Photo of ESAC Committee

The Ex Officio Trustee Educational Services Advisory Committee as of April, 2012: (left to right), back row: Jim Olson (CO), Julie Kagy (NC), Jonn Paris-Salb, Chair (CA); front row: Sally Giittinger (NE), Charlotte Lowry (AL).

Purpose of ESAC

The purpose of the Educational Services Advisory Committee (ESAC) is to:

ESAC Commendations 2012

Consistent with the Act to Promote the Education of the Blind (1879), the committee commends APH for:

  1. Responding effectively and in a timely fashion to input from the field through the use of website, meetings, advisory and ad hoc committees.
  2. Addressing the need to increase the number of individuals served.
  3. Increasing connections to university training programs by providing products to enhance training teachers.
  4. Continuing improvements to the APH Website.
  5. Providing an opportunity for EOTs to meet and work in small work groups during Annual Meeting to share best practices.
  6. Using video to promote APH products and services such as the Unforgettable Star Video and Home Grown Video.
  7. Providing personal contact and training for new SRS account assistants.
  8. Implementing new administrative features that allowed for an improved and more efficient SRS process.
  9. Utilizing the APH File Repository Council and the Louis Advisory Council as user-focus groups to gather input.
  10. Continuing the improvement of the online shopping site.
  11. Implementing valuable educational programs and adding exhibits to the museum, along with increasing digitization of the collections.
  12. Addressing and planning for the implementation of quality assurance for device repair.
  13. Through this process, the ESAC committee noted the APH staff know and live the mission, serve as professionals and are very responsive to the needs of all those in the field. As stated by a staff member during a presentation, “We like to make information available. That’s just who we are.”

ESAC Recommendations 2012

Consistent with the Act to Promote the Education of the Blind (1879), the committee recommends that APH:

  1. Consider broadening the selection criteria of the APH Scholars to include indirect service providers and increase the expectations of selected scholars.
  2. Increase the number of individuals served by APH products and services by using the EOTs as your resource.
  3. Develop specifically designed marketing materials similar to Leaders to Leaders Advocacy Program for targeted audiences so EOTS can promote the use of APH products and services to groups regarding early intervention and adult programs.
  4. Create new ideas to increase EOT attendance at Annual Meeting.
  5. Be proactive with federal initiatives such as the Common Core State Standards and the impact on APH products and services.
  6. Increase the tactile graphic image library by asking EOTs to solicit image templates; and APH form partnerships with other tactile developers.
  7. Expand online tutorials related to products and create an introductory tutorial on the use of the APH website.
  8. Explore ways to better notify users of discontinued items on the shopping site.
  9. Determine the feasibility of providing SRS data input with electronic upload from individual agencies to APH accounts.

Respectfully submitted,

Jonn-Paris Salb portrait
Jonn Paris-Salb, Chair
Educational Services Advisory Committee

Report of the Educational Products Advisory Committee

Report of the Educational Products Advisory Committee to the Trustees of the American Printing House for the Blind for Fiscal Year 2012.

Photo of EPAC

The Ex Officio Trustee Educational Products Advisory Committee as of April, 2012 (left to right), back row: Yvonne Ali (MO), Paula Mauro (OH), Collette Bauman (MI), Linda Lyle (NM); front row: Joe Catavero (NY), Jerry Kitzhoffer (PA), Marty McKenzie, Chair, (SC).

Purpose of EPAC

The purpose of the Educational Products Advisory Committee (EPAC) is:

Introduction to EPAC Report

In April, 2012, the Educational Products Advisory Committee (EPAC) met for the eleventh year as a formal advisory body to the American Printing House for the Blind (APH). The EPAC met with project leaders, other APH staff, and consultants. The committee appreciated the time dedicated to project discussions and preparation for the EPAC visit. APH staff clearly demonstrates passion, enthusiasm, and commitment to the vision of the company and is dedicated to the development of educational products for students who are blind and visually impaired.

EPAC Commendations 2012

  1. The EPAC recognizes that a commitment to continuous improvement is a commitment to an environment of change. The EPAC applauds APH staff for this effort as evidenced by the ability to articulate their department’s strategic planning; project leaders’ thoughtful outcomes based on past experience; and data showing continuous collaboration needed for excellence.
  2. The EPAC commends APH staff for its commitment to completing the Building on Patterns project. The EPAC recognizes that the emphasis placed on this project has sacrificed the completion of other products currently in development. The committee looks forward to celebrating the completion of Building on Patterns with APH.
  3. In challenging economic times, competition for limited resources in the workplace is a common occurrence. The EPAC commends the staff of APH for their increased commitment to collaboration and ongoing communication at every level. This has resulted in prioritizing workloads, in sharing limited resources, and in continuing their practice of developing high quality, data-driven products for the field.
  4. The EPAC recognizes that new products generate a high level of enthusiasm. The committee commends APH for their efficiency in strategically prioritizing workloads to ensure that textbooks, assessments and back-ordered products are made available to the field in advance of new products.
  5. The EPAC commends the Accessible Textbook Department for improving the timely delivery of large print and braille textbooks to students who are blind and visually impaired.
  6. The EPAC commends APH for its use of a standard interface for web-based products that provides a delivery model for consistent presentation and efficiency (i.e. SAM: Symbols and Meaning, Early Braille Trade Books).
  7. The EPAC commends APH for developing quality products for students who are blind and visually impaired through the establishment of collaborative partnerships with national and international partners (i.e. Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library Partnership, Les Doigts Qui Revent, Hilton-Perkins, Baum). We further commend APH for developing and implementing the Executive in Residence program.
  8. The EPAC commends APH staff for recognizing the need to balance the pace of rapidly changing technological advances and the demands for new products while maintaining reasonable costs.
  9. The EPAC recognizes APH staff for exhibiting efficiency and accountability in the use of taxpayer dollars while utilizing cost-saving methods in producing prototypes and first runs in the production process.

EPAC Recommendations 2012

  1. In accordance with the EPAC’s purpose to advise APH staff on the prioritization of needs and projects, the committee recommends that APH utilize experienced EPAC members as resources before allocating significant funds for high-cost products or changes in current products that may significantly impact the use of Federal Quota funds.
  2. In an effort to obtain relevant data for products appropriate for students with multiple disabilities, the EPAC again requests that APH obtain feedback from a variety of multi-disciplinary teams (i.e., physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech and language) as well as teachers of the visually impaired and certified orientation and mobility instructors when products are sent out for field-testing.
  3. The EPAC recommends that APH review current practices and develop a process for continuously updating dynamic products such as the CVI website and other web-based tools to maintain cutting-edge knowledge, research and practice.
  4. Following the finalization of Building on Patterns, the EPAC recommends that APH notify the EPAC of the completion date, as well as the established schedule for regular revisions.
  5. The EPAC recognizes that increased capacity in production has not matched the increased capacity in product development; this has resulted in a bottleneck in production. The committee recommends that APH review, revise and update current practices to expedite the movement of a product from concept through production.
  6. The EPAC recommends that APH continue the development of collaborative partnerships with outside agencies to produce products and alleviate bottlenecks in the production process.
  7. Based on the curriculum demands of the 21st century, the EPAC recommends that APH fast track products for science and mathematics especially those for the instruction of the Nemeth Code.

Respectfully submitted,

Marty McKenzie portrait
Marty McKenzie, Chair
Educational Products Advisory Committee 2012

Addendum to the Advisory Committee Reports, Provided by APH

APH Products Approved for Purchase with Federal Quota Funds, FY2012.

Girl using VisioBook

VisioBook: Portable Electronic Magnifier and Distance Viewer was introduced by APH during fiscal year 2012.

Distribution of Eligible Students

Based on the Federal Quota Census of January 3, 2011 (FY2012)

The Federal Quota Program was initiated in 1879 by the Federal Act to Promote the Education of the Blind. This program is a means whereby a per capita amount of money is designated for the purchase of educational materials for each eligible student registered through an established Federal Quota account. These Federal Quota accounts are maintained and administered by the American Printing House for the Blind (APH) and its Ex Officio Trustees.

The Federal Quota Registration is the census that records students who are eligible to receive materials provided by the Federal Act to Promote the Education of the Blind. This census is conducted through the Advisory Services portion of the act.

Distribution of Eligible Students, Fiscal Year 2012

Appropriate Use of Federal Quota Census Data

The specific purpose of the annual Federal Quota Census is to register students in the United States and outlying areas who meet the definition of blindness and are, therefore, eligible for adapted educational materials from APH through the Act to Promote the Education of the Blind.

Statements regarding student literacy, use of appropriate learning media, and students taught in a specific medium cannot be supported using APH registration data.

Number of Blind and Visually Impaired Students Registered, Fiscal Year 2012

US map showing number of blind and visually impaired students registered in the Federal Quota Program as of January 2011. See full data in table below.

Agencies Receiving Federal Quota Funds

Agencies for the Education of the Visually Impaired in the United States Receiving Federal Quota Funds Due Under an Act to Promote the Education of the Blind, Fiscal Year 2012

Note: The agencies listed in this section are in the following order within each state: State Departments of Education, Schools for the Blind, Rehabilitation Programs, Programs for Students with Multiple Disabilities.

*Note: The abbreviation "PNP" means "Private, Non-profit."

Alabama
Alabama State Department of Education, Talladega 951 $335,963.84
Alabama State Department of Education, *PNP, Talladega 76 $26,848.85
Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind, Talladega 302 $106,688.83
Totals 1,329 $469,501.52
Alaska
Alaska State Department of Education, Anchorage 171 $60,409.90
Totals 171 $60,409.90
American Samoa
American Samoa Department of Education, Pago Pago 36 $12,717.87
Totals 36 $12,717.87
Arizona
Arizona State Department of Education, Phoenix 829 $292,864.38
Arizona State Department of Education, PNP, Phoenix 231 $81,606.36
Arizona State Schools for the Deaf and the Blind, Tucson 219 $77,367.07
Totals 1,279 $451,837.81
Arkansas
Arkansas State Department of Education, Sherwood 249 $87,965.30
Arkansas State Department of Education, PNP, Sherwood 23 $8,125.31
Arkansas School for the Blind, Little Rock 122 $43,099.46
Lions World Services for the Blind, Little Rock 42 $14,837.52
Conway Human Development Center, Conway 72 $25,435.75
Totals 508 $179,463.34
California
California Department of Education, Sacramento 4,967 $1,754,713.29
California Department of Education, PNP, Sacramento 617 $217,970.23
California School for the Blind, Fremont 67 $23,669.38
Braille Institute of America Inc, Los Angeles 66 $23,316.10
Orientation Center for the Blind, Fremont 13 $4,592.57
Totals 5,730 $2,024,261.57
Colorado
Colorado Department of Education, Colorado Springs 444 $156,853.78
Colorado Department of Education, PNP, Colorado Springs 135 $47,692.03
Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind, Colorado Springs 75 $26,495.57
Rehabilitation Center, Denver 20 $7,065.49
Totals 674 $238,106.87
Connecticut
Board of Education & Services for the Blind, Windsor 645 $227,861.91
Board of Education & Services for the Blind, PNP, Windsor 2 $706.55
Oak Hill School, Hartford 17 $6,005.66
Connecticut State Department of Developmental Services, Hartford 74 $26,142.30
Totals 738 $260,716.42
Delaware
State Department of Education, New Castle 215 $75,953.97
State Department of Education, PNP, New Castle 3 $1,059.82
Division for the Visually Impaired, New Castle 0 $0.00
Totals 218 $77,013.79
District of Columbia
District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington 87 $30,734.86
District of Columbia Department of Human Services, Washington 0 $0.00
Totals 87 $30,734.86
Florida
Florida State Department of Education, Tampa 1,887 $666,628.57
Florida State Department of Education, PNP, Tampa 126 $44,512.56
Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind, St. Augustine 241 $85,139.10
Division of Blind Services, Daytona Beach 31 $10,951.50
Miami Lighthouse for the Blind, Inc., Miami 30 $10,598.23
Conklin Centers for the Blind, Daytona Beach 41 $14,484.25
Totals 2,356 $832,314.21
Georgia
Georgia State Department of Education, Clarkston 1,255 $443,359.22
Georgia State Department of Education, PNP, Clarkston 8 $2,826.19
Georgia Academy for the Blind, Macon 95 $33,561.06
Center for the Visually Impaired, Atlanta 42 $14,837.52
East Central Regional Hospital, Gracewood 1 $353.27
Totals 1,401 $494,937.26
Guam
Guam Department of Education, Hagåtña 30 $10,598.23
Totals 30 $10,598.23
Hawaii
Hawaii Department of Education, Honolulu 189 $66,768.84
Hawaii Department of Education, PNP, Honolulu 32 $11,304.78
Hawaii Center for the Deaf and the Blind, Honolulu 3 $1,059.82
Totals 224 $79,133.44
Idaho
Idaho State Department of Education, Gooding 239 $84,432.55
Idaho State Department of Education, PNP, Gooding 4 $1,413.10
Idaho School for the Deaf and the Blind, Gooding 25 $8,831.86
Idaho Commission for the Blind, Boise 22 $7,772.03
Idaho State School and Hospital 3 $1,059.82
Totals 293 $103,509.36
Illinois
Illinois State Board of Education, Chicago 1,915 $676,520.25
Illinois State Board of Education, PNP, Chicago 513 $181,229.71
Illinois School for the Visually Impaired, Jacksonville 99 $34,974.15
The Hadley School for the Blind, Winnetka 1,031 $364,225.78
The Chicago Lighthouse for People who are Blind or Visually Impaired, Chicago 259 $91,498.04
Illinois Center for Rehabilitation and Education — Wood, Chicago 69 $24,375.93
The Hope School, Springfield 14 $4,945.84
Totals 3,900 $1,377,769.70
Indiana
Indiana Department of Education, Indianapolis 698 $246,585.45
Indiana Department of Education, PNP, Indianapolis 8 $2,826.19
Indiana School for the Blind, Indianapolis 106 $37,447.07
Indiana Department of Education—Adult Students, Indianapolis 57 $20,136.63
Totals 869 $306,995.34
Iowa
Iowa Department of Education, Vinton 421 $148,728.47
Iowa Department of Education, PNP, Vinton 9 $3,179.47
Iowa Braille and Sight Saving School, Vinton 4 $1,413.10
Iowa Department for the Blind, Glenwood 39 $13,777.70
Glenwood Resource Center, Glenwood 11 $3,886.02
Totals 484 $170,984.76
Kansas
Kansas State Board of Education, Kansas City 512 $180,876.43
Kansas State Board of Education, PNP, Kansas City 118 $41,686.36
Kansas State School for the Blind, Kansas City 39 $13,777.70
Totals 669 $236,340.49
Kentucky
Kentucky Department of Education, Louisville 616 $217,616.96
Kentucky Department of Education, PNP, Louisville 48 $16,957.17
Kentucky School for the Blind, Louisville 49 $17,310.44
Kentucky Department for the Blind, Louisville 14 $4,945.84
Totals 727 $256,830.41
Louisiana
Louisiana Department of Education, Baton Rouge 455 $160,739.80
Louisiana Department of Education, PNP, Baton Rouge 3 $1,059.82
Louisiana School for the Visually Impaired, Baton Rouge 64 $22,609.55
Louisiana Center for the Blind, Ruston 87 $30,734.86
The Lighthouse for the Blind in New Orleans Inc., New Orleans 0 $0.00
Totals 609 $215,144.03
Maine
Maine Division for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Bangor 147 $51,931.32
Maine Division for the Blind and Visually Impaired, PNP, Bangor 6 $2,119.65
Totals 153 $54,050.97
Maryland
Maryland State Department of Education, Baltimore 671 $237,047.04
Maryland State Department of Education, PNP, Baltimore 138 $48,751.85
The Maryland School for the Blind, Baltimore 163 $57,583.71
Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind, Riverdale 29 $10,244.95
Totals 1,001 $353,627.55
Massachusetts
Massachusetts Department of Education, Malden 1,344 $474,800.63
Massachusetts Department of Education, PNP, Malden 47 $16,603.89
Perkins School for the Blind—Infants and Toddlers, Watertown 186 $65,709.02
The Carroll Center for the Blind, Newton 22 $7,772.03
Massachusetts Association for the Blind, Brookline 17 $6,005.66
Massachusetts Commission for the Blind, Boston 585 $206,665.45
Perkins School for the Blind—School Programs, Watertown 148 $52,284.59
Totals 2,349 $829,841.27
Michigan
Michigan Department of Education, Flint 1,925 $680,052.99
Michigan Department of Education, PNP, Flint 27 $9,538.41
Visually Handicapped Services/Detroit Receiving Hospital and University Health Center, Detroit 19 $6,712.21
Michigan Commission for the Blind Training Center, Kalamazoo 214 $75,600.70
Totals 2,185 $771,904.31
Minnesota
Minnesota Department of Education, Roseville 772 $272,727.74
Minnesota Department of Education, PNP, Roseville 7 $2,472.92
Minnesota State Academy for the Blind, Faribault 45 $15,897.34
Blind, Inc., Minneapolis 18 $6,358.94
Vision Loss Resources, Minneapolis 0 $0.00
Duluth Lighthouse for the Blind, Duluth 2 $706.55
Totals 844 $298,163.49
Mississippi
Mississippi State Department of Education, Jackson 219 $77,367.07
Mississippi School for the Blind, Jackson 81 $28,615.22
Addie McBryde Rehabilitation Center for the Blind, Jackson 14 $4,945.84
Reach Center for the Blind, Tupelo 9 $3,179.47
Totals 324 $114,107.60
Missouri
Department of Elementary & Secondary Education, St. Louis 980 $346,208.79
Department of Elementary & Secondary Education, PNP, St. Louis 200 $70,654.86
Missouri School for the Blind, St. Louis 46 $16,250.62
Alphapointe Association for the Blind, Kansas City 35 $12,364.60
Department of Social Services, Family Support Division, Jefferson City 13 $4,592.57
Totals 1,274 $450,071.44
Montana
Montana State Department of Public Instruction, Great Falls 201 $71,008.13
Montana State Department of Public Instruction, PNP, Great Falls 12 $4,239.29
Montana School for the Deaf and the Blind, Great Falls 13 $4,592.57
Totals 226 $79,839.99
Nebraska
Nebraska State Department of Education, Nebraska City 366 $129,298.39
Nebraska State Department of Education, PNP, Nebraska City 6 $2,119.65
Nebraska Center for the Education of Children Who Are Blind or Visually Impaired, Nebraska City 16 $5,652.39
Totals 245 $137,070.43
Nevada
Nevada Department of Education, Carson City 357 $126,118.92
Totals 357 $126,118.92
New Hampshire
New Hampshire Department of Education, Concord 152 $53,697.69
New Hampshire Department of Education, PNP, Concord 20 $7,065.49
Totals 172 $60,763.18
New Jersey
New Jersey Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Newark 1,326 $468,441.69
St. Joseph’s School for the Blind/Concordia Learning Center, Jersey City 134 $47,338.75
Totals 1,460 $515,780.44
New Mexico
New Mexico State Department of Education, Alamogordo 501 $176,990.41
New Mexico State Department of Education, PNP, Alamogordo 7 $2,472.92
New Mexico School for the Visually Handicapped, Alamogordo 110 $38,860.17
Totals 618 $218,323.50
New York
New York State Education Department, Batavia 2,689 $949,954.54
New York State Education Department, PNP, Batavia 1,223 $432,054.44
Lavelle School for the Blind, Bronx 110 $38,860.17
The New York Institute for Special Education, Bronx 118 $41,686.36
New York State School for the Blind, Batavia 52 $18,370.26
Helen Keller National Center 30 $10,598.23
Totals 4,222 $1,491,524
North Carolina
North Carolina Department of Public Education, Raleigh 1,146 $404,852.32
North Carolina Department of Public Education, PNP, Raleigh 407 $143,782.63
The Governor Morehead School, Raleigh 327 $115,520.69
Division of Services for the Blind, Raleigh 20 $7,065.49
Totals 1,900 $671,221.13
North Dakota
Department of Public Instruction, Grand Forks 157 $55,464.06
Department of Public Instruction, PNP, Grand Forks 17 $6,005.66
North Dakota School for the Blind, Grand Forks 71 $25,082.47
Totals 245 $86,552.19
Northern Mariana Islands
Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands (CNMI) Department of Education 16 $5,652.39
Totals 16 $5,652.39
Ohio
Ohio State Department of Education, Columbus 1,623 $573,364.16
Ohio State Department of Education, PNP, Columbus 27 $9,538.41
Ohio State School for the Blind, Columbus 98 $34,620.88
Totals 1,748 $617,523.45
Oklahoma
Oklahoma Department of Education, Oklahoma City 760 $268,488.45
Oklahoma School for the Blind, Muskogee 91 $32,147.96
Totals 851 $300,636.41
Oregon
Oregon Department of Education, Salem 627 $221,502.97
Oregon Department of Education, PNP, Salem 31 $10,951.50
Totals 658 $232,454.47
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania Department of Education, Harrisburg 1,623 $573,364.16
Pennsylvania Department of Education, PNP, Harrisburg 22 $7,772.03
Overbrook School for the Blind, Philadelphia 376 $132,831.13
Western Pennsylvania School for Blind Children, Pittsburgh 169 $59,703.35
Blind And Vision Rehabilitation Services of Pittsburgh, Homestead 27 $9,538.41
Royer-Greaves School for the Blind, Downingtown 25 $8,831.86
Totals 2,242 $792,040.94
Puerto Rico
Puerto Rico Department of Education, San Juan 705 $249,058.37
Puerto Rico Department of Education, PNP, San Juan 17 $6,005.66
Instituto Loaiza Cordero para Niños Ciegos, San Juan 65 $22,962.83
Rehabilitation Center for the Blind of Puerto Rico, San Juan 64 $22,609.55
Totals 851 $300,636.41
Rhode Island
Rhode Island Department of Education, Providence 150 $52,991.14
Rhode Island Department of Education, PNP, Providence 44 $15,544.07
Totals 194 $68,535.21
South Carolina
South Carolina Department of Education, Columbia 519 $183,349.35
South Carolina Department of Education, *PNP, Columbia 6 $2,119.65
South Carolina School for the Deaf, Blind, and Multihandicapped, Columbia 165 $58,290.26
South Carolina Commission for the Blind, Columbia 23 $8,125.31
South Carolina School for the Deaf, Blind, and Multihandicapped, PNP, Columbia 48 $16,957.17
South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs, Columbia 474 $167,452.01
Totals 1,235 $436,293.75
South Dakota
South Dakota Department of Education, Pierre 52 $18,370.26
South Dakota School for the Blind & Visually Impaired, Aberdeen 133 $46,985.48
South Dakota Rehabilitation Center for the Blind, Sioux Falls 8 $2,826.19
Totals 193 $68,181.93
Tennessee
Tennessee State Department of Education, Nashville 773 $273,081.02
Tennessee State Department of Education, PNP, Nashville 27 $9,538.41
Tennessee School for the Blind, Nashville 146 $51,578.04
Totals 946 $334,197.47
Texas
Texas Education Agency, Austin 5,049 $1,783,681.84
Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Austin 145 $51,224.77
The Lighthouse for the Blind of Houston, Houston 43 $15,190.79
Criss Cole Rehabilitation Center, Austin 62 $21,903.01
Texas Department of Mental Health-Mental Retardation, Austin 401 $141,662.99
Totals 5,700 $2,013,663.40
Utah
Utah State Office of Education, Ogden 492 $173,810.95
Utah Schools for the Deaf and the Blind, Ogden 105 $37,093.80
Totals 597 $210,904.75
Vermont
Vermont State Department of Education, South Burlington 135 $47,692.03
Totals 135 $47,692.03
Virgin Islands
Virgin Islands Department of Education, St. Thomas 20 $7,065.49
Totals 20 $7,065.49
Virginia
Virginia Department of Education, Richmond 1,275 $450,424.71
Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind—Staunton, Staunton 43 $15,190.79
Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, Richmond 68 $24,022.65
Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired, PNP, Richmond 15 $5,299.11
Totals 1,401 $494,937.26
Washington
Washington State Department of Public Instruction, Vancouver 820 $289,684.91
Washington State Department of Public Instruction, PNP, Vancouver 65 $22,962.83
Washington State School for the Blind, Vancouver 64 $22,609.55
Totals 949 $335,257.29
West Virginia
West Virginia State Department of Education, Romney 241 $85,139.10
West Virginia State Department of Education, PNP, Romney 3 $1,059.82
West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and the Blind, Romney 89 $31,441.41
Totals 333 $117,640.33
Wisconsin
Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, Janesville 848 $299,576.59
Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, PNP, Janesville 26 $9,185.13
Wisconsin School for the Visually Handicapped & Educational Services for the Visually Impaired, Janesville 40 $14,130.97
Totals 914 $322,892.69
Wyoming
Wyoming Department of Education, Riverton 95 $33,561.06
Wyoming Department of Education, PNP, Riverton 66 $23,316.10
Totals 161 $56,877.16
GRAND TOTALS 59,193 $20,911,364.42

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