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Let's Eat book opened to Desserts Page 6 LDQR Literacy Products for Young Learners

Get in touch with literacy through tactile books and games produced for APH by the French tactile book publisher, Les Doigts Qui Rêvent (LDQR). LDQR has received recognition over the years for its storybooks; most recently the 2018 IBBY-Asahi Reading Promotion Award, given biennially to one outstanding group or institution whose activities are judged to have made a lasting contribution to the promotion of reading for children. Offered on Federal Quota, the following list of LDQR products can be used to assist in early learning.

Books

All storybooks contain richly textured collage-style illustrations with interactive features that are visually attractive and have appeal for all young learners as well as adults sharing the books with a child. The illustrations’ design is based on research into the needs of tactual learners. Text is provided in large print and contracted Unified English Braille (UEB), provided as clear, silkscreened braille of high quality and durability.

How to Recognize a Monster

How to Recognize a Monster uses tactile illustrations that can be manipulated to help the reader recognize a monster. Each illustration features a different part of the monster’s body. A sequential discovery takes place throughout the book, with a complete representation of the monster at the conclusion.

A child’s hand touching the monster’s red textured mouth and raised pointy teeth.

Six Little Dots

The Six Little Dots storybook introduces and names Dots 1 through 6 as they each take their proper place in a braille cell. The tactile illustrations are interactive. Little Dot 1—sliding on elastic—hops and moves about, exploring different dot positions along the way. The last pages of the book provide a display and a game wheel for the child to play “Which Little Dot Am I?”

Intended to be read aloud and shared with children with visual impairments, ages three years and up, Six Little Dots encourages fingertip texture discrimination and exposure to spatial concepts—top, middle, bottom, above, below, and under. For students ready to be introduced to dot positions and names, it offers a fun approach to this step in their learning.

Six Little Dots Book Interior Close Up

Back in Stock -Let’s Eat!

In Let’s Eat, embark on a journey of reading and tactile learning with Little Wolf and Little Chick as they discover and devour a variety of foods. For emergent print readers, pictures act as an important bridge helping the child take a more active role in reading, as a listener and as a reader. Tactile illustrations in Let’s Eat! are designed to serve a similar purpose. In addition, they offer critically important opportunities to build exploratory skills, tactile discrimination skills, and encounter spatial relationships.

An open storybook. On the left page it says "'Let's eat!' calls mother wolf. But little wolf is not hungry... not even as hungry as a little chick... Take the little wolf and put him on your finger." On the right page there is a red gingham background. A white pocket in the center holds a little felt puppet of wolf with a red tongue.

Games

Six Little Dots, Game of Cards-UEB

Six Little Dots Game of Cards offers 42 colorful tactile cards that belong to one of seven different texture “families” (names in print and braille on each card). Within each family are six unique cards, each with a single textured Dot in numbered positions modeled after the arrangement of dots in a braille cell. The goal is to collect all six Dot cards needed to form a complete family.

Six Little Dots with package and cards on display

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